Baked Salmon with Avocado Mango Salsa

Of all the ways there are to cook salmon, baking it is one of the easiest. Just brush the fillets with a little olive oil, sprinkle with salt, and cook in a hot oven on a foil-lined pan for 10 minutes. No fuss, no mess, no difficult clean-up. One of my favorite things to serve with salmon is avocado. In this recipe we are gently tossing avocado with a little chopped mango, red onion, serrano chile, and lime juice for a sweet, sour, and savory salsa (try saying that five times fast!) Perfect to adorn our simple baked salmon. Enjoy!

Baked Salmon with Avocado Mango Salsa Recipe

  • Prep time: 20 minutes
  • Cook time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4.

Ingredients

  • Olive oil
  • 4 6-ounce salmon fillets
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 small or 1 large mango, not overly ripe (1 to 1 1/2 pounds of mango)
  • 2 just ripe avocados
  • 1/4 cup minced red onion
  • 1 serrano chile, minced (with seeds for more heat, without for less)
  • 2 limes, juiced (about 4 Tbsp lime juice)

Method

1 Preheat oven to 400°F. While the oven is preheating, prep the mangos.  Either peel and then cut away the mango flesh from the core seed, and then cut the mango into 1/3-inch cubes, or follow the instructions here on How to Cut a Mango. Set the cut mango aside in a medium bowl.

baked-salmon-avocado-salsa-1 baked-salmon-avocado-salsa-2

2 Line a roasting pan with aluminum foil. Spread some olive oil on top of the foil. Coat the salmon fillets with olive oil and lay, skin side down, on the foil lined roasting pan.  Sprinkle with salt. Place in the 400°F oven and cook for 10 minutes.

3 While the salmon is cooking, prep the other ingredients. Cut the avocados in half. Remove the seeds. Score the inside of the avocados with a small knife in a cross hatch pattern. Scoop out the avocado pieces and add them to the bowl with the cut mango pieces. (See How to Cut and Peel and Avocado.) Add the minced red onion, serrano chile, and lime juice to the bowl. Sprinkle with a little salt. Gently fold the ingredients together.

Serve the salmon fillets with a generous portion of avocado mango salsa.

Links:

Avocado and Apple Soup with Poached Salmon, from Cannelle et Vanille

Buttered Crouton Salad with Avocado and Smoked Salmon, from Joy the Baker

Baked Salmon with Avocado Mango Salsa on Simply Recipes

 

31 Comments

  1. Sean

    It’s nice to see a nice simple recipe for a change. I like to bake the salmon with the mango on it though just for sweetness, my family is picky about ‘fishy’ tastes. oh well :-)

  2. Sandy S

    Oh My Elise! You really know how to brighten things up!These are some of my very favorite foods. Avocados, mangos, red onions and salmon! Not to mention fresh ground pepper, limes and Serrano peppers, which can come to my party anytime. This is like a pinball machine going off in my head! Cannot wait to try this!

  3. roxy

    I’ve always eat my food with tortillas or bread if need i’m not used to eating the food alone with what can i combine somebody please help me out :-):-):-)thank u

  4. Lis

    I love this! The ingredients are already in my fridge, so I’m heading out to get some salmon later. Thanks for the idea!

  5. Evie Lieb

    My favorite way to prepare salmon–with a variety of different sauces or toppings. However, I find it easier to serve the fillets if I don’t oil the foil. The skin sticks to the foil and I just slide a spatula between the meat and the skin and lift the skinless salmon right off onto the plates. Your photo with the avocado is utterly mouthwatering!

  6. Jayne

    We eat salmon so so often! But I love that side of avocado salsa to kick things up a notch. Thanks for that inspiration. PS… We love love love the crispy skin.

    • Elise

      Yet the seeds are closest to the hottest part of the chile, and manage to absorb some of that heat. Harold McGee has this to say about the seeds in his seminal book On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, “Chillis are hollow fruits, with an outer wall rich in carotenoid pigments that encloses the seeds and the spongy mass called the placenta. Their pungent chemicals, the capsaicins, are only synthesized by the surface cells of the placenta, and accumulate in droplets just under the cuticle of the placenta surface. That cuticle can split under pressure and allow the capsaicin to escape and spread onto the seeds and the inner fruit wall.” Harold continues to instruct, “The cook can reduce the pungency of chillis substantially by cutting them in half and carefully dissecting and removing the spongy placental tissue and the seeds.” (My emphasis in bold.)

      So while you are factually correct that the heat is not located in the seeds, the seeds are indeed hot. (If you don’t believe me, just try eating the seeds of a hot jalapeño!)

  7. mantha

    Oh, my goodness — there’s not a single thing in this recipe I don’t love. The simplest things are the best! That’s going to get some use this summer — maybe with the salmon grilled outdoors. I love the idea of having it with tortillas, too.

    I’m thinking of a pomegranate or raspberry granita for dessert.

  8. Heidi

    Just made this tonight- wonderful! I’m already trying to figure out what else to put the salsa on since it was so tasty and refreshing. I used fresh caught salmon from Alaska and it may have been the best salmon dish I’ve ever had.

    Thanks for a great site. -Heidi

  9. Tana

    Just made the avocado mango salsa tonight and served with grilled shrimp; it was excellent. I added some cilantro and we loved it. Thanks for the recipe; next time will try it with salmon

Post a comment

Your comment may need to be approved before it will appear on the site. Thanks for waiting. First time commenting? Please review the Comment Policy.

Some HTML is OK. URLs are automatically converted to links. Line breaks are automatically converted to paragraphs. The following HTML tags are allowed: a, abbr, acronym, b, blockquote, cite, code, del, em, i, q, strike, strong