Baked Stuffed Artichokes

Stuffed artichokes are a perfect artichoke appetizer! Globe artichokes are trimmed and stuffed with herbed parmesan breadcrumb stuffing, then baked.

  • Prep time: 25 minutes
  • Cook time: 1 hour, 5 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 large globe artichokes
  • 4 slices lemon
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 3 cups fresh breadcrumbs (from 6 slices white bread)
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup chopped parsley
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon fresh oregano, minced
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper

 

  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 slices lemon
  • 2 cloves garlic, halved

Method

1 Make fresh breadcrumbs: Cut off the crust from 6 slices of bread. Chop the centers and put into a food processor. Pulse until you have coarse breadcrumbs.

2 Make the stuffing: In a large bowl, stir together the breadcrumbs, lemon zest, Parmesan cheese, minced garlic, chopped parsley, minced oregano, 1/2 cup olive oil, and black pepper. Set aside.

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3 Prep the artichokes: Cut off the stem, leaving 1/2 inch from the bottom row of leaves. Using kitchen scissors, cut off 1/2-inch of the tips of all of the artichoke leaves.

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Cut 1 inch from the top of the artichoke. (It helps to use a serrated knife like a bread knife for this.)

Take a slice of lemon and rub over the cut edges of the artichokes to keep them from turning brown.

4 Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).

5 Stuff the artichokes: Use your finger to gently pull open the center leaves of the artichokes. Pull out the inner tender yellow artichoke leaves. Use a small metal spoon to scrape and scoop out all of the inner fuzzy choke.

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Note that removing the choke at this stage isn't entirely necessarily, and it does require some elbow grease. That said, it makes eating the stuffed artichoke a much easier, and more enjoyable experience.

Place artichokes on a sheet pan (to catch the breadcrumbs) and start stuffing the artichoke with your stuffing mix. Put some stuffing mix between each large leaf and the artichoke, as well as a generous amount in the center.

6 Bake the artichokes: Put about 1/2-inch of hot water in the bottom of a baking dish that will snugly hold the artichokes. Add 2 slices of lemon, a bay leaf, 2 cloves garlic to the water.

Place the artichokes sitting upright in the water. Drizzle with remaining 2 Tbsp olive oil.

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Cover with aluminum foil. Pierce the foil a few times with the tip of a sharp knife (to vent steam).

Bake for 1 hour at 375°F (190°C), or until a knife easily penetrates the heart of the artichoke or you can easily remove one of the outer petals. (Depending on the size of the artichoke baking time can vary from 50 minutes to 1 hour 20 minutes.)

Remove artichokes to a serving dish to serve.

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Comments

  • Malggy

    I like to boil the cleaned artichokes for about 15 minutes, adding garlic, parsley, lemon and salt to the water (vegetable bouillon works too). Meanwhile, I sauteed the cleaned and chopped stems of the artichokes with a little butter and olive oil. Add some parsley, white wine, lemon juice and steam it at low heat for a few minutes, then turn off heat and add Panko bread crumbs salt and pepper.
    Put the artichokes in buttered baking pan and stuff them with this mixture and some Parmigiano cheese and a little bit of the flavored water used to boil the artichokes. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 15 minutes. Uncover and topped with more Parmigiano mixed with a bit of Panko and broil until golden.
    They will be tasty, moist and the stuffing, nice and little be crunchy and pretty looking on top!
    Hope you like this

  • Mark Downey

    I love to cook and often make up my own recipe when preparing something I’m familiar with. However, never having cooked a whole artichoke I followed this recipe very closely. Then I read a comment about including Italian sausage and added that as well.
    Prep time was tougher than expected. I mixed everything and stuffed my artichokes. I put them in for an hour at 375. One hour later, they were well below temp. Another 1.5 hrs and they were almost temping. I uncovered and topped with a little more cheese.
    The result was dreadful. I have been cooking since I was 14, that’s a total of 40 years.
    The only thing I can think of is: I purchased them at Wal-mart, they were the size of large grapefruits. After cleaning and stretching open they were like small cantaloupe. They remained very tough and uneatable and the extra cooking time dried out my stuffing.
    I guess I should have first learned “how to pick out fresh artichokes”. To top it all off, it was a surprise birthday meal for my wife.
    Well, I was definitely surprised!!
    Mark

    • Elise Bauer

      Hi Mark, it sounds like you got a hold of some rather large tough artichokes that needed more cooking time than average. The longer cooking time still shouldn’t have dried out the stuffing if you added more water to the baking pan.

  • Terri Baker

    I love stuffed artichokes and so does my family. They’re very versatile and you can change the recipe slightly every time you make them. I’ve put salad shrimp in the crumb mixture, ground beef, and tomorrow night I’m going to use Italian sausage. I’ve also heard of people who make them with pine nuts, anchovies and use tomato soup instead of water to cook them in. I never remove the choke before I put them in a baking pan with about an inch of water. We have a family of adults and everyone knows that it needs to be removed. The prep is always the same. I give them a lemon juice bath (I use the bottled kind) and cut the stems and the leaf tips off before stuffing them with the crumb mixture and drizzling with olive oil. I take the aluminum foil off for the last 20 minutes and melt more cheese on the top for about 5 minutes. I also serve them with real melted butter. It’s probably not good for the heart because it raises the cholesterol but it tastes good. I probably should save the stems next time and cook theminstead of throwing them away. I assume they’re edible.I hate wasting food.

  • Patti Fendt

    I have been making stuffed artichokes for friends and family for years. I have always used extra garlic and Parmesan cheese. It seems more flavorful. However I am preparing artichokes right as I am writing this and intend to use the lemon. I’ll let you know the out come!

  • Margaret

    I made this, it was delicious! I’ve never removed the choke pre-cooking, but when you said you need a strong spoon and elbow grease, I thought: Grapefruit spoon! Works like a charm…

  • Tina

    Does anyone use the leftover stuffing mixture in any way? I made too much and would love an idea of what to do with it. I was thinking of stuffing mushroom caps.

    • Elise Bauer

      I think stuffing mushroom caps would be a terrific idea.

    • Charles

      Over talapia or cod fillets with slices of lemon. Bake

  • victor @ ifoodblogger.com

    I am not an artichoke lover… wait, I used to not be one, I am now! My wife made this recipe and we all loved the dish!

  • Maria Paradiso Browne

    This recipe is very similar to the one my family has used for years. Being from Italy, this is a traditional way to prepare artichokes. One difference in our recipes is that we add ground nuts to the breadcrumb mixture. The nuts add great flavor and a bit of substance to the stuffing. We do not remove the choke before preparing, but I think I’ll try it that way next time! Thanks for sharing.

  • Sherry Tew

    I learned this method of cooking artichokes many, many years ago from an Italian friend. I actually purchased little metal artichoke stands that hold the artichoke upright in the stockpot in which about an inch of water is placed. The artichokes are cooked with the lid on until you can pull one of the outer leaves off – that is how I always know they are done! She didn’t teach me to remove the choke before stuffing, though. We just knew not to eat that fuzzy part and scooped it out so we could eat the delicious heart. Yummy!!! You can play with the seasonings you use and have fun enjoying a variety of flavors. Just think how good this would taste with quinoa, onions, garlic, turmeric and some chili powder? Thanks Elise for your great recipes!

  • Evelyn M

    I LOVE these. My mother taught me how to make them. She herself learned the recipe from my paternal grandmother (I am guessing it is an Italian recipe, as her family came from Naples). We use finely chopped day-old French bread and add olives. And we use exactly the same stuffing for chicken and turkey, it is amazing.

  • MaryM

    Why fresh breadcrumbs? I’ve cooked many artichokes but never stuffed them. Being a lazy kind of cook, I’m tempted to use the Italian flavored Panko crumbs. Even if a few of them stay crunchy, that would be fun,too, right?I have a huge artichoke laughing at me from the kitchen counter right now. Could split it with the hubs tonight. Silly boy likes the leaves, but gives his half of the bottom to me.

    • Elise Bauer

      Hi Mary,
      There’s more body to fresh breadcrumbs, and they are softer which is pleasant to eat with the artichoke leaves. You might try mixing some of your panko crumbs with fresh breadcrumbs.

      • MaryM

        Thanks. Though that would defeat the laziness aspect.

  • Rosina Morrone-Reeves

    Our family is from Calabria, Italy the province of Cosenza. We have been making Stuffed Artichokes like this for many many generations. Easter dinner was never without them. When the fresh artichoke is hard to come by we would purchase the artichoke hearts and stuff them the same way. They came out equally delicious and very very tender. Your recipe is very similar to how we make them thank you for posting and sharing your version, they look delizioso!

  • Cheryl A.

    Why am I scared of making artichokes like this? My husband loves them. LOVES THEM! Yet, I cannot get the nerve to buy them whole like this. I trust all of your recipes so feel a need to try this one but am not ashamed to tell you – I’m scared – LOL!!

    • Elise Bauer

      Hi Cheryl, that’s too funny! I guess trying something new can be a little intimidating. The good news is that the only thing at risk here is one’s time, a few bucks for the ingredients, and one’s pride. If you want to start cooking a whole artichoke, I recommend steaming it. Check out http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_cook_and_eat_an_artichoke/.

      Stuffed artichokes are a little more complicated, but not hard. The tricky part is scraping out the fuzzy choke. You have to use a strong spoon and put some elbow grease into it. If it’s too much of pain, you can just skip that part and only stuff the leaves.

      The other thing with this recipe, or with the steamed artichoke recipe, is that the artichoke is done when the leaves can easily pull away from the artichoke. Sometimes that takes more cooking time than you would expect. Sometimes less. It all depends on how large and tough the artichokes are that you are cooking.

      Good luck!

      • Cheryl A.

        I have to admit when I first opened the Site and saw this recipe, my first thought was “Oh Crap!!” I have to now face my fear… I am going to give it a shot and surprise my Hubbies… I’ll let you all know how it goes… Thanks so much! I think… Cheryl A.