Borscht

Delicious borscht soup made with fresh red beets, beef shank, onions, carrots, potatoes, cabbage, dill, and sour cream.

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Photography Credit: Elise Bauer

My first memorable encounter with borscht was at a pot-luck party I had in San Francisco, in which my friend Elisabeth brought a huge, must have been 12 or 16-quart, pot of drop-dead delicious, deep purply red soup filled with beets.

Elisabeth’s grandparents were Ukrainian, and I think borscht was one of her favorite soups to make. Every time I make or eat borscht I think of my friend and the discovery of how good a soup made primarily of beets can be.

The wind is howling outside, if any leaves remain on the trees they are sure to come down today. Here is a wonderfully satisfying beet borscht, perfect for a cold weather day.

Recipe and photos updated 1-17-17

Borscht Recipe

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  • Prep time: 20 minutes
  • Cook time: 2 hours, 30 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 6 to 8

The soup is best made a day ahead, giving the flavors time to meld.

Ingredients

  • Olive oil or vegetable oil
  • 1 1/4 pound slice of bone-in beef shank with a lot of meat (or 1 pound of stew beef), excess fat trimmed
  • 1 large onion, chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 8 cups beef broth or beef stock, divided 4 cups and 4 cups
  • 4 large beets (about 1 1/2 pounds), peeled, chopped
  • 4 carrots (1 lb), peeled, chopped
  • 1 large russet potato (.75 lb), peeled, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 cups thinly sliced cabbage
  • 3/4 cup chopped fresh dill
  • 3 Tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Method

1 Brown the beef, add onions: Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large, thick-bottomed pot on medium high heat. Add the shank slice or stew beef. Let the beef brown lightly on one side, then turn over.

Add the chopped onions to the pot. Let the onions cook and soften, about 5 minutes.

2 Add 4 cups broth, cook until beef is tender: Pour 4 cups of beef broth over the beef and onions in the pot. Bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer, cover and cook until the meat is falling-off-the-bone tender, about 1 hour 30 minutes.

3 While the beef is cooking, prep and roast the beets, carrots, and potato: Peel and chop the beets, carrots, and potatoes into 1/2-inch pieces. Toss the beets and carrots with a teaspoon or two of olive oil and spread them out in a single layer on a foil lined roasting pan. Roast in a 400°F oven for 15 minutes.

Toss the potatoes with olive oil and make room for them in the roasting pan, and roast everything an additional 15 minutes.

4 Remove the meat from the pot. Once the beef has cooked through until tender in step 2, remove from the pot, and take the pot off the heat. If you are using a beef shank, remove and discard any bone, connective tissue, and excess fat. Chop the meat into bite sized pieces.

5 Skim off excess fat from the liquid in the pot.

6 Finish cooking the soup: Return the pot to the stove and add the remaining broth, the carrots, beets, and the diced potato. Add the chopped meat to the pot, the sliced cabbage, and a half cup of the fresh dill. Bring to a simmer, and cook for another 15 minutes or so, until the cabbage is cooked through.

Add the vinegar and season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. I use about 2 teaspoons of salt and 1 teaspoon of pepper, but the amount you use will depend on how salty your beef broth is to begin with.

The soup is best made a day ahead. (The longer the soup sits by the way, the more it will all turn the deep red color of beets.)

Serve ladled into bowls with a dollop of sour cream and a sprinkling of fresh dill.

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Recipe adapted from (and substantially changed from) one in Bon Appetit Magazine.

Links:

Refreshing borscht from Bea of La Tartine Gourmande

Borscht with Meat from Natasha's Kitchen

Vegetarian Borscht from Pille of Nami Nami

Showing 4 of 36 Comments

  • Susie Schwarz

    Has anyone tried freezing this delicious soup? If so, do the potatoes come out fine, or were they mealy?

  • Patty

    Thank you for a gorgeous recipe. I enjoyed it very much and couldn’t get enough of the soup!

  • Kat

    I never properly thanked you.
    I’ve been using this recipe for years. It’s simple, authentic, and delicious. Thank you so much for sharing it with us.

  • Sidonie

    Borscht has definitely become one of my favourite soups, also great when you freeze some to eat later. I recently made a bet with a Russian friend (who happens to also be a chef) about who’s borscht would be better. So we had an impartial friend try both. In then end she amalgamated the two recipes, so I guess in a way we both won. My recipe is similar to this but without the beef and without all the skimming and whatnot, and the my friend’s version adds cream and a little grated parsnip.

  • Annabelle

    Made this yesterday. I was abit apprehensive at first because the process seemed so simple, it doesnt have spices or anything. But I made it and it turned out to be very nice.

    It definitely tastes better the next day!

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