Cajun Turkey Pot Pie

Winter took its sweet time coming to Northern California this year, but it did finally arrive, and here we are with long, chilly nights and frost-kissed mornings. Perfect weather for a warming bowl of pot pie. There is the classic chicken pot pie of course. But with the holidays we thought we might try our hand at a turkey pot pie made with cooked turkey, a perfect dish for holiday leftovers. This turkey pot pie has a Cajun twist, starting with the trinity of onions, celery and green bell peppers, and spiced up a bit with Cajun seasoning. It’s topped with a flaky, buttery crust, which is in my opinion, the best reason of all to make a pot pie.

Follow on Pinterest

Cajun Turkey Pot Pie Recipe

  • Prep time: 1 hour, 15 minutes
  • Cook time: 40 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 6-8.

You can make the pot pie either in individual ramekins or in one large casserole dish.

Ingredients

Filling:

  • 5 Tbsp peanut oil or unsalted butter
  • 3 celery stalks, chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped yellow or white onion
  • 1 large green pepper, chopped
  • 1-2 jalapeno peppers, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 cups diced, cooked turkey meat
  • 2 Tbsp Cajun seasoning*
  • Salt
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 cups turkey or chicken stock
  • 1 cup dark beer (brown ale or Guinness)
  • 1 cup diced tomatoes

Pie Crust:

  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) chilled unsalted butter, diced into 1/2-inch cubes (best to chill cubes in the freezer for at least 15 minutes before using)
  • 3 to 4 Tbsp chilled ice water

Egg Wash:

  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 Tbsp cream

*If you can't find Cajun seasoning in your local market, you can make your own with 3/4 teaspoon each of salt, pepper, dried oregano, dried thyme, and 1 1/2 teaspoons each of paprika, garlic powder, and onion powder.

Method

cajun-turkey-pot-pie-a1.jpgcajun-turkey-pot-pie-a2.jpg
cajun-turkey-pot-pie-a3.jpgcajun-turkey-pot-pie-a4.jpg

1 Make the pie crust dough. Pulse the flour and salt together in a food processor. Add the chilled butter cubes to the food processor and pulse 5 times. The dough should resemble a coarse cornmeal, with some pea-sized pieces of butter. Slowly add the chilled water (make sure there are no small ice cube bits), just a tablespoon at a time, pulsing once after each addition, until the dough just sticks together when you press some between your fingers. Empty the food processor, placing the dough mixture on a clean surface. Use the heel of your palm to shmoosh the dough mixture onto the table surface a few times. This action will help flatten and spread the butter between layers of flour, so that the resulting dough will be flaky. Once you've done this a few (5 or 6) times, use your hands to mold the dough into a disk. Sprinkle the disk with a little flour, wrap it in plastic wrap, and let it chill for an hour, or up to 2 days, before rolling out.

2 To make the filling, heat the oil over medium-high heat and sauté the onion, celery, green pepper and jalapeno, stirring often, until they are soft, about 6-8 minutes. Add the garlic, turkey meat, Cajun seasoning, and salt. Mix well and cook another 1 minute, stirring once or twice.

3 Bring the stock and beer to a boil in a small pot. Sprinkle the flour over the turkey and veggies and mix well. Cook for 4-5 minutes, stirring often and making sure no flour burns on the bottom of the pan. Slowly pour in the hot stock-beer mixture, stirring. It will seize up at first, then, as you pour in more stock and stir, will form a silky sauce for the turkey. Add the tomatoes and cook until the mixture thickens, about 3-5 minutes. Pour the filling into a 2-quart casserole or, if you wish, into individual ramekins.

cajun-turkey-pot-pie-1.jpgcajun-turkey-pot-pie-2.jpg
cajun-turkey-pot-pie-3.jpgcajun-turkey-pot-pie-4.jpg

4 Prepare the crust. Roll dough out on a lightly floured surface to a little less than a quarter-inch thick. If you are using a casserole, roll into a sheet a little larger than the dish. If you are using ramekins (use 10 ounce ramekins), cut the dough into 6 rounds that are slightly larger than the circumference of the ramekins. Lay the dough onto the filling. Fold the excess dough under itself and use the tines of a fork to press the dough against the edge of the ramekins. Cut a 1-inch vent into each individual pie, or several if you are making a casserole. Whisk together in a small bowl the egg yolk and cream for an egg wash. Use a pastry brush to paint the egg wash over the crust. This will help the crust brown nicely.

5 Bake at 400°F for 25 minutes, or until the pastry is golden and the filling is bubbling. Let cool for at least 5 minutes before serving.


Hello! All photos and content are copyright protected. Please do not use our photos without prior written permission. If you wish to republish this recipe, please rewrite the recipe in your own unique words and link back to the source recipe here on Simply Recipes. Thank you!

Links:

Leftover Turkey Pot Pie - from The Pioneer Woman
Cheesy Turkey Pot Pies - from the Picky Palate
Turkey Pot Pie with Sweet Potato Topping - from Food Blogga


turkey-pot-pie-casserole.jpg

13 Comments

  1. Linios

    This Turkey Pot Pie look delicious.

  2. Brooke @ Food Woolf

    Wow. It doesn’t get much better than a spicy turkey pot pie! Holy smokes! I need to make this. Stat!

  3. Deanna

    That crust looks like it shattered into a million pieces. We have leftover chicken and my dad just made some andouille sausage which I think will be fantastic in a Cajun pot pie. Thanks for the inspiration!

  4. Susan

    I love your twist on a simple pot pie. It is the perfect remedy to a cold winter night because it holds heat so well…The spices just make it that much warmer!

    Your method with the handling of the crust is how I make all my pie crusts. I divide the dough into halves (example: for a double crust pie) and section each half of dough into quarters and rub out each section with the heel of my hand then scrape it all into a single pile with my bench scraper. Then flatten the pile into the disk to wrap and chill. It makes the dough so much more pliable and managable and creates layer and layers of the flakiest pastry I’ve ever had. It is the best method of handling pie dough I’ve ever used. (I can thank Maggie Ruggiero of Gourmet for this (fraisage) method..there’s a video on Gourmet’s site on youtube to see how it’s done)

  5. Stephanie

    Although we did ham this Christmas, I will have to try this recipe however my family likes the cornbread crust. Do give it a try – different plus for those of us who sucks at making pie dough, this is much easier.

  6. D.Finesmith

    I made this last night with leftover christmas goose. The pie crust is simply perfect. As someone who has cooked a lot of cajun and creole dishes I made a few changes. In addition to the Zatarain’s seasoning I added thyme and sage and two andouille sausages sliced and sauteed. When preparing the holy trinity of green pepper, celery and onions I first made a roux to sauté them in.

  7. Deidra

    I can’t wait to make this, Elise! What size ramekins did you use?

    6 10-ounce ramekins. ~Elise

  8. Andrea Winchester

    I was planning to make a turkey pot pie tonight, and now I am even more excited due to your Cajun twist on the recipe! Mmmmm I can’t wait to try it.

    Thanks Elise and have a wonderful New Year.

  9. Alana D

    I have got to make this,cajun turkey & pot pie..this is pure awesomeness!

  10. Lisa @ Life in Green

    Hoping to make this soon. Would the crust fit for a 9×13 casserole dish?

    I think I used a 9×13 pyrex for one of the iterations. The crust should fit fine. ~Elise

  11. Briony

    Hi Elise, absolutely love your site! I want to make this recipe for my boyfriends birthday, and he loves potatoes, corn and peas. I was wondering if you think they would go well with this recipe. Thanks!

    You mean instead of the recipe’s filling ingredients? I wouldn’t do peas with the jalapeños, but the potatoes and corn might work. Who knows. If you try it that way, please let us know how it turns out for you. ~Elise

  12. Chef Cooley

    Elise would a bottom crust be ok, or would it turn out soggy? Can’t wait to try this one. Thanx much.

    These types of pies are not meant to have bottom crusts. Yes it would be soggy if you followed the filling recipe as is. ~Elise

  13. Katie

    I still have Guinness in my fridge that needs to be used up from St. Paddy’s Day. This will be perfect!

Post a comment

Your comment may need to be approved before it will appear on the site. Thanks for waiting. First time commenting? Please review the Comment Policy.

Some HTML is OK. URLs are automatically converted to links. Line breaks are automatically converted to paragraphs. The following HTML tags are allowed: a, abbr, acronym, b, blockquote, cite, code, del, em, i, q, strike, strong