Chicken and Dumplings

Recipe updated Aug, 2011

Chicken and dumplings – the ultimate comfort food. When we were kids, my mother used to make chicken and dumplings for us by simply adding Bisquick biscuit dough to chicken stew. We would always fight over the dumplings. (Ever wonder why people from big families eat fast? The first kid who finished could get seconds on the dumplings.) Making dumplings that are tasty, light, yet hold together isn’t a given. The Bisquick version, although light and fluffy, tends to fall apart. At the other end of the spectrum, my dad remembers his mother’s dumplings which were, in his words “as hard as hockey pucks”. Leftovers would be grated the following morning and fried up like potatoes.

The dumplings in this recipe are firm enough to hold together without disintegrating even after multiple reheats of the stew, yet still manage to be light and fluffy. The key is to not peek into the pan while the dumplings are cooking. The dumplings need to gently steam in the simmering stew to result in a light texture. Using cake flour in place of all purpose flour will also help the dumplings be lighter, as cake flour has less gluten than regular flour.

To coax more flavor into the stew base, we brown the chicken pieces before cooking them in the stew, and we also create a roux by browning flour in the rendered chicken fat, before slowly adding liquid.

Chicken and Dumplings Recipe

  • Prep time: 15 minutes
  • Cook time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 6 to 8.

Ingredients

Chicken and Vegetables:

  • 3 to 3  1/2 pounds chicken thighs and breast parts, skin-on, bone-in, trimmed of excess fat
  • 2 teaspoons butter or olive oil, or a combination of both
  • Salt
  • 1 quart chicken stock (homemade is best)
  • 2 to 3 celery stalks, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 2 cups)
  • 3 medium carrots, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces (about 2 cups)
  • 1 large onion, roughly chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 cup dry sherry or vermouth (optional)
  • 1 Tbsp of heavy cream (optional)
  • 3/4 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh parsley leaves
  • Ground black or white pepper

Dumplings:

  • 2 cups (250 g) cake flour (can sub all-purpose flour, but use cake flour if you have it, your dumplings will be fluffier)
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 Tbsp butter, melted
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup minced fresh herb leaves such as parsley, chives, and tarragon (optional)

Method

1 Heat the chicken stock to a gentle simmer in a medium pot.

chicken-dumplings-1 chicken-dumplings-2

2 In a large (8 qt), thick-bottomed pot, heat the butter or olive oil over medium-high heat. Pat dry the chicken pieces and sprinkle with salt. Working in batches, brown the chicken pieces, placing the pieces skin-side down first; this will render out fat you will use to build the stew later.

3 Once the chicken pieces are browned on all sides, remove them from the large pot, and turn off the heat. Remove and discard the skin from the chicken pieces and put the chicken pieces into the pot of simmering stock. Poach the chicken in the stock until cooked through, about 20 minutes or so. Remove the chicken pieces and set on a tray to cool for a few minutes. When the chicken pieces are cool to touch, pull the meat off the bones and cut into 2-inch chunks. Set aside.

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4 Return the heat on the large pot to medium-high. When the pot is hot, add the onion, celery, carrot and thyme and sauté until soft, but not browned, about 4-5 minutes. Add the flour and stir well. The flour will absorb the fat in the pot and will stick a little to the bottom. Reduce the heat to medium-low and stir the flour vegetable mixture constantly for 2-3 minutes. Do not let it burn.

5 Get a ladle ready and have the pot of simmering chicken stock nearby. Add the sherry to the flour vegetable mixture. It will sputter and seize up. Add a ladle of hot chicken stock to and stir well. It will be goopy. Add another ladle, then another, stirring all the while, until the broth comes together. Add the rest of the chicken stock, the reserved chicken meat. Increase the heat and bring to a simmer, then reduce the heat to maintain a gentle simmer while you make the dumplings.

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6 Make the dumpling batter by whisking together flour, baking powder, and salt in a medium bowl. Add (optional) chopped fresh herbs. Add melted butter and milk to the dry ingredients. Gently mix with a wooden spoon until mixture just comes together. (Note: do not overmix! or your dumplings will turn out too dense.)

chicken-dumplings-9 chicken-dumplings-10

7 Drop dumpling batter into the simmering stew by heaping teaspoonfuls, over the surface of the stew. (Note that the dumplings will easily double in size as they cook.) Cover and simmer until dumplings are cooked through, about 15 minutes. Once you have covered the pan, do not uncover and peek while the dumplings are cooking! In order for the dumplings to be light and fluffy, they must steam, not boil. Uncovering the pan releases the steam. If after 15 minutes they are still not cooked through (use a toothpick or skewer to test) cover pan again, and cook for another 5 to 10 minutes.

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8 Gently stir in peas, parsley and cream, if using. Add more salt to taste. Ladle portions of meat, sauce, vegetables, and dumplings into soup plates and serve. Note that the stew will continue to thicken the longer it sits.

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Chicken and Dumplings on Simply Recipes

59 Comments

  1. Ozzie

    Following is a chicken and dumpling recipe from my Mother (now deceased) from Oklahoma. The dumpling portion might be of interest to try since they are excellent (not hockey pucks by any means):

    CHICKEN & DUMPLINGS
    (Use my Chicken Noodle Soup recipe and
    substitute dumplings for noodles)

    (1 ½ lb. Order)

    3 cups unsifted flour,
    2 eggs,
    2 egg whites,
    2 tbsp olive oil,
    2 tsp salt,
    1 tsp baking powder,
    tbsp’s of water as needed.

    Mix into firm, pliable dough. 10 minutes. Wrap in wax paper and let set for at least 10 minutes (preferably longer). Divide into 2-4 balls. Dust with flour. Roll into thin sheet (flour as necessary), slice into ½” by 3 or 4” strips. Slowly drop into boiling mixture while stirring.

    CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP
    (12 QTS.)

    1 large chicken, extra backs & necks,
    12 chicken bouillon cubes,
    1 cube butter,
    2 tbsp dried parsley, crushed,
    2 tbsp dried shallots, crushed,
    2 tbsp dried leeks, crushed,
    1 cup diced carrots } ½ at start,
    2 cups diced celery } ½ in 2 ½ hours,
    3 cups chopped onions,
    Salt & pepper to taste.

    2 lbs medium (1/4” wide) noodles } last 20 minutes,
    (3 for very thick)
    1 Bay leaf,

    Bring water (*) to boil & simmer approximately 2 ½ hours.
    Remove chicken to cool. Dice chicken and return to pot for last ½ hour.

    Carrots, celery & onion ½ at start, ½ after 2 ½ hours.

    Total time approx 4 hours.

    (*) 9 qts for soup
    6 qts for dumplings (use 2 orders of dumplings)

    Hi Ozzie, thank you for posting your mother’s recipe. You must have come from a large family, this looks like it could feed a small army! :-) Seriously, it looks delicious, thank you. ~Elise

  2. Jonathan

    I spent the day making this for my sick boyfriend, and he loved it so much! Far better than the traditional rice congee I learned how to make for the sick from my mother. I also indulged in this, and I will definetely be making this again, sick or not!

  3. JoHunter

    I took ideas from this recipe but accomodated it for ingredients I had on hand. I already had bits of poached chicken so I diced up carrots, onions, potatoes, celery and sweated them for 15 minutes. Then I added the chicken gravy, chicken pieces and dumplings. Absolutely delicious, thanks a lot.

  4. Molly

    Thank you for this recipe! This is the first time I have made a gravy for my chicken and dumplings before and really enjoyed the extra flavor I got from the broth!

  5. Dan

    Yes, but I like the hockey pucks. I have used the same recipe on different occasions to get fluffy dumplings as well as hockey pucks. What’s different to get them to turn into hard, gooey, stick-to-the-roof-of-your-mouth goodness? Is it time, temperature, thickness of gravy, covering, turning, what?

    Well, if you work the dough a lot by continuing to mix after the dough has already come together, that will make them thicker. And boiling them in the stew (cooking in an uncovered or partially covered pan) will keep them denser as well. ~Elise

  6. Yvette

    I have a quick version of Chicken and Dumplins, that I’ve always made. I tried this recipe, my hubby likes it better. Guess no more using canned biscuits for dumplins…waaa waaa ;) This recipe is very tasteful, and it will be replacing my old recipe. Appreciate you sharing it.

  7. easter freouf

    I tried this chicken and dumpling recipe and it was so good. I plan on making it again. Thanks for the recipe.

  8. Emily

    This was my first time hacking up and skinning a chicken, and the whole time I thought, “These chicken and dumplings really better be worth all this.”

    They were. This dish was phenomenal. Seriously the best chicken and dumplings I’ve ever tasted. It was worth all the time and effort.

    This will now be my chicken and dumplings recipe. Thank you, Elise. Your site is awesome, and I check it everyday. Keep up the good work!

  9. Suzanne

    I find Cooks Illustrated a little annoying because their cumbersome techniques and insistence on certain items don’t always help with getting dinner on the table quickly with ingredients and equipment you have on hand.

    I made chicken and dumplings earlier this week. This is how I modified their techinique:

    I poached a whole chicken with the vegetables, etc. that one usually uses in chicken stock. Removed the chicken when it was done. I had more broth than I needed, and it was a little weak, so I turned the heat up and let it reduce while the chicken cooled and I cut up the vegetables.

    When it had reduced enough, I strained it, sautéed my veggies in the pot until softened, added back the broth, added the chicken, thickened the broth with flour, added the dumplings, and let everything cook. The vegetables were cut small enough to cook while the dumplings cooked. It was quicker, I only used one pot and the container I strained the broth into, and the vegetables and chicken were not overcooked.

  10. tastyeatsathome

    Elise, the dumplings in this recipe are amazing! Perfectly light and fluffy. And I would have never thought to put parsley in them, but it lightens an otherwise heavy dish.

    I did modify your recipe according to what I had on hand, but the dumplings were just as written. My husband made Emeril Lagasse’s Turkey Gumbo Ya-Ya the other day, and there is always a lot of leftover spicy turkey broth from that recipe. I saved it and used it in this recipe, and I also had leftover turkey which I used, rather than boiling a chicken from scratch. But I loved the dish, and I will make it as you have it written in the future! Thanks for sharing!!!

  11. Lori

    Love Cook’s Illustrated. They save me time when I’m trying out new recipes.
    My Mimaw used to make chicken and dumplings, but hers were the flat type of dumpling. She made more of a butter pie crust, but only rolled it out to twice a normal pie crust thickness. Then, she would slice them into 2″ x 2″ strips and add them. I have always been a bigger fan of those types of dumplings, but love to put these fluffy ones into just more of a chicken broth. Kinda like Matzo balls, without the Matzo, for chicken soup.

  12. Sally

    When I was a little girl my Mom used to take me to the next large town to shop. While there, we always stopped at a cafeteria for lunch. This was a “ladies who lunch” kind of place. Servers carried your tray to your table, and there was a light on the table to be turned on if you needed anything.

    I always had chicken and dumplings when we went there. It was served in a soup bowl with the chicken mixture on the bottom and one large dumpling on top.

    Over the years I’ve tried numerous recipes in an attempt to duplicate that dish. Some came close, nothing was ever just right.

    Then I found Ina Garten’s recipe for Chicken Pot Pie. The chicken mixture was just right. I found a dumpling recipe, which is similar to yours, but includes two eggs.

    Heaven in a bowl! I make this a couple times each winter and use the chicken mixture for other things as well.

  13. Kay

    I grew up eating Chicken and Pastry (eastern NC), but people in other areas always called them dumplings. We rolled out the dough and cut it in strips like someone mentioned above. But we also let the strips dry out overnight before we added them to the chicken and broth. Delicious!

  14. Dennis

    I’ll have to try this. When I was in college I always used an easy cheat – even easier than Bisquick mix. I’d just get a can of Pillsbury dinner rolls, cut them into quarters, roll them a bit in my hands to make the wedges more spherical, and plop them into my soup.

  15. Michelle

    I laughed when I saw your dad’s description of his mom’s dumplings because it sounds exactly like my dad’s description of my mom’s dumplings.

    The family story has it that, right after they were married in the early 80s, my mom cooked chicken and dumplings which would break your tooth. She nearly (if not completely) broke the garbage disposal trying to get rid of them.

    As a result of this story, I’ve never had chicken and dumplings made by my mother. I think, actually, I’ve only had them once in my 23 years, made by someone else’s mother.

  16. Karen S

    What is the flavor difference of not adding the vermouth?

    Hard to describe if you don’t usually cook with vermouth. Vermouth adds a lovely note; if you have it, I recommend using it. ~Elise

  17. Bookwoman

    This sounds so good. I’ve tried and tried to make dumplings. An elderly neighbor told me she used sliced flour tortillas. They are PERFECT for our family as they stay tender without forming large pieces of bread. I love the flavorings included in the dumpling recipe. I figure they make all the difference.

  18. jessica

    I want to make chicken and dumplings. Have a true craving for them but the problem is that I work 7 days a week. I drive 2 1/2 hrs daily to and from wk. Normally its around 6 pm when I get home ( up and out of the house by 6am). Is there a really quick easy maybe crock pot verison I could try? I would really love for my girls to try chicken and dumplings for the 1st time.

    If you are pressed for time, I suggest breaking up the cooking for this recipe over two days. Make the stock and poach the chicken on one day, it hardly takes any work, just some time, which you can easily do while preparing another meal. Then on the second day, assemble the stew, which should take about 30 minutes. ~Elise

  19. sarah

    Sorry, I’m in the south and I just can’t eat “drop”dumplings. It’s like eatting a big ball of paste. I use the rolled out strips of dough; they cook a lot faster too. If you don’t have time to make them (they are only broth or warm water and non self-rising flour), just buy the pastry strips in the frozen dough section of the grocery store(most stores down south have them). To get the basic “chicken and dumplings” I boil the chicken, when done remove the bones and return the meat to pot ,add 3 chopped boiled eggs, salt and black pepper to taste, bring to a rolling boil add pastry strips, stir slowly to keep strips from sticking together, cover reduce heat to low and cook at least 10 mins and then turn off heat and let sit covered for 20 mins. If broth is too thin, add a 1/4 cup of flour mixed with a little broth to thicken (before adding strips). If you want to add veggies, it’s your choice.

  20. Petite Kitchen

    I will definately have to try this. I’ve never thought of putting herbs in the dumplings before, it sounds really good. I wonder though, could this soup be successfully frozen and rewarmed on the stove?

  21. mma

    Is there a way (or recipe) to make the dumplings slightly chewy (think of the skin for Asian-style dumplings) instead of fluffy and biscuit-y? That’s the way I grew up eating Chicken and Dumplings. :-)

  22. Dana

    Chicken and dumplings is one of my all-time favorite meals. As soon as I saw this on your awesome site the other day, I knew I had to make it. Yesterday was the day, and these were the best chicken and dumplings I have ever had. This is my new go-to recipe for C&D. Thanks so much!

  23. Phoebe

    Wonderful comforting dish on a snowy day! Thank you. I have never made chicken and dumplings, and I have only had the dish twice. Not as good as this. This was delicious and the kids liked it too!

  24. Cortney

    I made this tonight and OH MY GOSH… serious, delicious comfort food! We all loved it! Thanks Elise!

  25. Dan

    I am relatively new subscriber, so I made the Chicken and Dumplings as my first recipe from this site. They were fantastic, much better than from my childhood memories. Elise, thank you and please keep up the good work.

  26. Alicia

    Wow! Wonderful recipe! No gooey, heavy, bisquick style dumplings here. Thank you! Had a ball making it and the entire pot was devoured.

  27. michellefromohio

    What an excellent recipe for dumplings! I used to use my Grandma’s recipe which were harder, rolled out and cut dumplings, and I must say I like these better. And so much easier to make! I will be making these again soon.

  28. Soleado

    I made this tonight. It was delicious. :). This site has good recipes. :). The broth part is like a chicken pot pie, with the roux and veggies. So, if you’re wandering what it’s like – imagine chicken pot pie with dumplings. It was in the 70’s here today, but – it was just as good. :).

  29. Jeannetta

    JUST what I was looking for!

  30. Charley

    Hm…the stew turned out great (will definitely use for Chicken Pot Pie and the like) but the dumpling batter didn’t quite make it. I measured the 2 cups of flour with dry-measure cups – but I had to knead the dough for it to “come together.”
    Could you elaborate on the dumplings a bit?

    The dumpling dough should be “shaggy” like a biscuit dough. You should not have to knead it. If it isn’t coming together, sounds like it is too dry, add a little more milk. The reason it could be too dry is that we are measuring in volume here not in grams, and the standard cup measurement isn’t so standard actually. Also, sometimes people just scoop up flour with a measuring cup, which ends up compacting the flour too much in the measuring cup. The flour should be scooped lightly with a separate spoon into the measuring cup, and not packed down in any way, and leveled off with a knife. But in any case, if the mixture is too dry, add a teaspoon or two of milk. ~Elise

  31. Julie

    My husband and I discovered this recipe for Chicken and Dumplings and we couldn’t wait to try it. I followed the recipe just as its presented and it was by far the best I’ve ever found. Since finding your site every meal we’ve had over the past week has come from your collection of recipes and we are enjoying every meal. Thanks for sharing these great recipes!

  32. Dorothy

    Either I ate this when I was really hungry, or it”s the best thing I’ve ever made. Thank you so much.

  33. Suzanne

    We had this tonight and it was wonderful! I started with chicken broth I had made already the day before, and then simmered breasts and drumsticks from those chickens in the broth as per your recipe. That really adds a lot of flavor. Rave reviews all around!

    I have yet to be disappointed by one of your recipes, and this is getting to be my go-to recipe website.

    Thank you!

  34. Andy

    Elise –

    I made this today and it turned out great. Thanks for the recipe! Quick question… During the steaming of the dumplings, I had the burner on medium heat. I was (obviously) unable to stir the contents of the pot, so the bottom burned. It had no noticeable negative effect on the stew, but I’d like to learn to avoid it if I can. Any tips?

    Thanks.

    What constitutes “medium heat” can vary so much on different stovetops. When we went to a powerful gas top we had to completely readjust our thinking. Medium on electric was similar to low on the gas. So, I would lower the heat. Also I would suggest making sure that you are using a thick-bottomed pan, so that the heat is more even. ~Elise

  35. Gen

    Try adding chopped celery leaves to the dumpling batter or as garnish. I added it to my matzo balls and it helped tie together the flavor of the soup and the dumplings. Just an idea!

  36. Jill

    Since my husband I do not like dark meat I made this with chicken breasts and used chicken broth instead of the water. We both LOVED it!! It was DELICIOUS and the dumplings with the cake flour were light and fluffy. Will make again!! THANK YOU!

  37. Randi Lynne

    Yesterday I tried your version of chicken and dumplings. I must say that they are vastly different from any Southern version I’ve ever had, but they were DELICIOUS! The texture of the steamed dumplings was much more pleasing than the typical boiled taste from other versions I have had. Also, I have never had dumplings with carrots and peas. I liked the inclusion of more veggies, though.

    Thanks for the great recipe!

  38. Yeni

    I tried to make my first (American style) dumpling based on your recipe tonight. Since I never had proper dumpling before, I wasn’t so sure how the batter was supposed to look like. Is it wet or a bit on the drier side? Is the dumpling supposed to be dense inside? I actually bought bread flour, not the cake one. Does it make a difference? Thank you.

    Hi Yeni, the type of flour makes a big difference. Bread flour will make a denser, more structured dumpling because bread flour has more gluten than regular flour. Cake flour will produce a lighter, fluffier dumpling because it has less gluten than regular flour. If you make the dumplings with cake flour, as indicated in the recipe, the dumplings should be rather light and spongy. If you make them with all purpose flour, a little more dense. If you make them with bread flour (not recommended) even more dense. ~Elise

  39. Lynn Kessel

    This recipe is great. I have always thought of myself as the queen of chicken soup but I have never browned the chicken parts before. I will always do that in the future. The stock was golden brown and lovely. Thank you!!!!

  40. Don

    My grandmother made Bisquick dumplings which were light, fluffy, and floated on top of the chicken stew. They were also oily from the chicken fat they absorbed. Yummm. I don’t remember them falling apart.

    I had chicken and dumplings at a girlfriend’s house once. The dumplings were dense, hard little lumps about 1/2 the size of an egg that didn’t float.

    Since then I’ve been confused about what dumplings are supposed to be.

    I’m gonna make this. Sounds great.

  41. SueL

    Hi, thanks for posting this recipes. Brings back great memories of the stews my parents used to make. My mother used to make the best dumplings ever, but she used to use suet to make them back in England. Now overseas, no one has heard of Suet, asking in a supermarket I just got blank looks, and I could tell them what it was made off. Getting my sister to send me vegetable suet didn’t seem right. So I was amazed that you could make dumplings without it. Cant wait to try it on my family.

  42. Andrea

    This recipe was great. I know I could have taken shortcuts but I really enjoyed the process of your recipe and at the end of it I felt a sense of accomplishment (and was quite satiated by the result). The dumplings were divine. It was my first time cutting up a chicken (I probably could have done a better job) and my first time making a stock. Thanks!

  43. Monique

    The stew was amazing….the stock prep was well worth the work as it added flavors that canned stock couldn’t come close to replicating. I was, however disappointed with the dumplings. Light, fluff(ier) dumplings are not a problem. They were unusually bitter. I checked the dumpling recipe I usually use from my 1953 Better Homes and Gardens cook book and its very similar–thou it calls for all purpose flour and oil instead of cake flour and butter (which I used as you recommended). The new can of baking powder I used was “double acting.” I THINK I buy the same kind all of the time, but I am not sure. Do you think this could be the problem…?

    Hmm, not sure. Perhaps the cake flour was old? Anything off could have caused the dumplings to be bitter. ~Elise

  44. Precia

    Wow! This recipe is absolutely fantastic! I made this for my mother today because she was feeling a bit under the weather. She loved it and so did I! I have been cooking all of my life (17 years) and this is the best chicken dish I have ever made!

  45. dorene

    Elise,
    Do you think this would freeze well? I’m looking for yummy comfort food to freeze in inividual portions for my mother in law who is getting out of the hospital. Thanks for the recipe.

    Hi Dorene, I honestly don’t know. I rarely freeze meals. But if you try it, please let us know how it works out for you. ~Elise

  46. Harlee

    Thanks a bunch I am a learning cook and I think that this is prefect recipe for any one new cook or experienced cook. I know I will have to make this for my family again (because its so good). In a big family like mine theres not a lot to make food so recipes like this one are awesome. Thanks again

  47. donutty

    Another fantastic recipe, Elise. My family gobbled up the dumplings! Perfect for a cold, wet evening.

  48. Marie

    This is an amazing recipe, as usual. Since the whole chickens were unbelievably expensive last week, I bought backs and bone-in breasts. 3 Chicken backs and 3 bone-in breasts were enough for this recipe (I used 4 breasts and had 1 left over). Amazing, and will definitely make again (and again).

  49. Dan MacAndrew

    Ok, I’ve been using your recipes for awhile now and have never once posted even a simple thank you. From the Beef Bourguignon to Chili Con Carne to the Blueberry Buckle, all have been excellent and I’ve said nothing. Over time, you’ve become my go-to site that consistently delivers. From me? Nada.

    Last night I did the Chicken and Dumplings (with some revisions) and my wife said it tastes just like Grandma’s. Enough said. It’s time I owned up and gave credit where credit is due. Thank you. Thanks for all the amazing recipes you, your family and friends have shared. I am and will continue to be a loyal follower.

  50. Jessica

    I just made this. It was delicious! Great tip about steaming the dumplings–mine came out nice and tender.

  51. Stacey

    I’m planning on making this tonight – but I’m starting with an already-cooked rotisserie chicken I got at Costco. There’s a bunch of yummy juice/grease in the bottom of the container that I can start with and once I take the meat off the bones, I can throw them in to make the broth. Any other suggestions?

  52. Karee

    I made this last night, and it was DELICIOUS! My friends must have thanked me 20 times for making it. Thanks for the great recipe.

  53. at mz_lexi

    omgeee i have been looking for a way to get fluffy chickn n dumplings like my granny used 2 make she passed b4 any1 could learn the key to a great dumpling is that they rise in the pot ppl who stir them just make gooey uncooked dough balls there is a diff btween that type of gooey n tha gooey that u make by letting ur dumpling absorb tha broth in your bowel of later mixed n tha pot (after they r cooked) thnk u 4 posting i cant wait 2 try this … i was shocked 2 read n learn that ppl use strip style dumplings i’m black n most black house holds ive been 2 cook them this way but like most thngs not every1 can cook so yes again they will come out nasty and un cooked

  54. asma

    Wondering how the dumplings will taste on day 2…will they become soggy? Would it be better to make fresh dumplings on day 2?

    Thanks!

    I think it would be much better to make the dumplings fresh on day 2, if you want to serve a dish that doesn’t taste like leftovers. ~Elise

  55. KK

    This sounds delicious, however this is not the traditional chicken and dumplings of the south. The southern version doesn’t have any veggies. Just chicken, stock and dumplings. This recipe sounds more like a chicken stew with dumplings added. I will give it a try.

  56. Brenda-Sue

    I made this tonight and followed the recipe to the letter. As someone who grew up with Acadian french “dumplings” which are flour water dropped dumplings that sink and are very dense and chewy, these dumplings were VERY weird at first. They are definitely light and fluffy. Like a boiled biscuit.

    However, this is probably the best thing I’ve eaten in AGES. Un-freaking believable! I have a new go-to recipe for chicken soup, chicken pot pie, chicken and dumplings, chicken noodle soup, and matzo ball soup. You just can’t beat this. It’s worth the work.

  57. Claudine

    Hello Elise, I too, have been a fan/ reader/ user of your amazing recipe collection for several years and have to thank you SO very much for this particular recipe. It is amazing, and blows away any chicken pot pie/ stew/ soup recipe I’ve ever had/ attempted. It’s SO flavourful and rich – I found that it didn’t even need the cream at the end. The roux with the rendered chicken fat and sherry appears to be the crucial keys. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

    So glad you like it! ~Elise

  58. Heidi Stone

    I made this for lunch today! Deelish!

    I only had BSCB, so I didn’t have the fat to work with from the skins. I used 4 T. butter and 1/4 c. flour. This is a small recipe for our big family though! I used 3 qt of chicken broth and doubled the veggies.

    VERY TASTY! Thanks for a great recipe!

  59. julie

    This dish was super good, but I couldn’t figure out for the life of me why on God’s green Earth you would say to discard the skin & bones. I left them in for more flavor. It worked.

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