Creamed Corn

Corn season has finally arrived. This morning my father picked up some yellow corn from the local farmer’s market that was so fresh we could eat it raw. Must have been picked this morning. Did you know you could eat corn raw? You can if it has been picked within a few hours, at least the sweet corn we get. I was inspired by a recipe in Everyday Food to make creamed corn, which is quite a treat when the corn is so fresh. I added some nutmeg, and a little more butter to the original recipe.

Creamed Corn Recipe

  • Prep time: 10 minutes
  • Cook time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 6.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 large onion, finely chopped
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 8 ears corn, husks and silk removed
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper

Method

creamed-corn-1.jpg creamed-corn-2.jpg

1 In a large saucepan, melt 1 Tbsp of the butter on medium heat. Add the chopped onions and cook 2 to 3 minutes until translucent.

2 While the onion is cooking, remove the kernels from the corn. Stand a corn cob vertically over a large, shallow pan (like a roasting pan). Using a sharp knife, use long, downward strokes of the knife to remove the kernels from the cob. Use the edge of a spoon to scrape the sides of the cob to remove any remaining pulp.

3 Add the corn to the onions and butter in the saucepan. Add 2/3 a cup of water and the remaining 1 Tbsp of butter. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat and cover. Cook for 10-15 minutes until the corn is tender.

4 Add the sugar, nutmeg, and cream to the corn. Cook, uncovered, for 5-6 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add salt and pepper to taste.

 

15 Comments

  1. doodles

    When we grew corn many years ago we would eat it right out of the garden……well when we could get to it before the racoons. Your post brought back very fond memories..thanks

  2. Abby

    That’s a beautiful dish, but where I’m from we never eat yellow creamed corn. Only white. Silver Queen, most likely. My great aunt is the BEST at it. I tried to have her teach me how when I graduated from college, and she did, but she had no exact measurements! That’s how it is with everything. she. makes. OH! I’m from N.C., by the way.

  3. michael sills

    When I make creamed corn I do not use water to cook just sauté in butter. I use a bit of corn meal at the end to thicken. Last time I tried tumeric which was a really good contrast to the sweetness of the corn…

  4. Anonymous

    I eat corn raw that I’ve bought from the grocery store. But then again my store has excellent produce. I can’t always use it without cooking it for a minute or two, but I’d say 80% of the time it goes straight from the cob into a salad!

  5. marlene

    My nephew Michael loves cream corn and he absolutely loved this recipe. As a single guy, he is used to cream corn “out of the can” and this recipe has him hooked!

  6. linda j hudson

    Used canned corn, put 1 tsp sugar, 1/8th teaspoon nutmeg and 1/2 cup and heavy cream into
    food processor. Set aside.

    Sauteed red pepper/green chile and celery
    added flour as called for in recipe.

    Added chicken breast cut into small peices
    and milk to above.

    Simmered 15 min.

    Added cheese and french onion on top and served

    Serve with three cheese bread and a Riesling or
    chenin blanc or fume blanc.

  7. Aubrey Toole

    Anything added to fresh creamed corn other that a little flour, salt, pepper and water takes away from the natural flavor of the corn. Cut the grains from the cob as stated, scrape milk from ear. Add about 1/2 cup of self rising flour, salt and pepper to taste then add water until it becomes soupy. While this is being done fry about 3 slices of hog jowl or side bacon in IRON skillet. Remove meat from skillet, pour corn into hot drippings, stiring to get the drippings mixed into corn. When corn starts to thicken add more water (a little at the time) until it reaches the thickness your disire (this all being done on medium to medium low heat). Cook covered about 5 mins., remove lid and let cook at a slightly lower heat for another 5. Put in bowl and served with fresh sliced tomatoes. That,my friends is TRUE Southern creamed corn!

  8. tebbykat

    I thought it was delicious! I didn’t have nutmeg so I used a dash of pumpkin pie spice (I figured it has nutmeg in it, right?) and it was scrumptious! My 2 year old LOVED it and I don’t see any law against putting onion in creamed corn. Thanks for the great recipe!

  9. Nan Vogee

    When I heard a simular recipe on TV the cook thickened the Cream Corn by blending some of the mix so that is what I plan to do. Does make sense. Then I plan to freeze some. Thanks!

  10. Veronica

    I have an ingenious tip for all of you: USE A BUNDT PAN to cut the corn from the cob. Place the cob in the hole in the center of the Bundt Pan and then cut the corn from the cob, it all lands in the pan and cob is steady in the hole in the middle!!

  11. Kimberly

    Our local orchard was having a sweet corn festival this weekend, so my husband and I went to get a few dozen ears. I love cream corn, but I’d never made it from scratch. Till now. I have to say, I love this recipe!!!! It was perfect — even better than the cream corn I get at my favorite restaurant in town. I loved the addition of the nutmeg too. I know a few people didn’t like it, but I think it adds a little something special to the dish. I wouldn’t change a thing.

    I did like the idea of pureeing a bit of the corn for a creamier texture, but my husband loves the larger bits of corn. He’s never been a fan of the canned variety that seems more soupy than anything. For those of you who worry that there’s too much liquid, you can cook it a little longer than the 5 – 6 minutes recommended. Every batch of corn will be different, so keep that in mind.

    Again, thanks for another great recipe! Now, I have loads of yummy creamed corn in my refrigerator to enjoy for the next few days.

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