Danish Pork Burgers

I met Iowa hog farmer Paul Willis at the Fancy Food Show in January and naturally our conversation turned to food and recipes. “Have you ever had a pork burger?,” Paul asked, eyes bright. Upon hearing my response in the negative, Paul added, “You have to try my wife Phyllis’ pork burgers. They’re amazing.” Thinking of burgers made out of pork, I can’t say I was convinced, even when he continued, “Everyone in Iowa eats pork burgers.” But when Paul pointed out his wife’s recipe in the Niman Ranch Cookbook I saw the light. These burgers aren’t hamburgers made out of ground pork. They are more like large, flattened Swedish meatballs. Very tasty. Thank you Paul and Niman Ranch, and thank you Phyllis for a fabulous recipe.

Danish Pork Burgers Recipe



  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 1 red onion, finely diced
  • 16 saltine crackers, crumbled
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • Vegetable oil for cooking
  • Dijon mustard for serving


1 Using your hands to combine, mix together the pork, saltines, onion, eggs, milk, salt, and pepper in a large bowl.

pork-burgers-2.jpg pork-burgers-3.jpg

2 Lightly brush a large, nonstick frying pan with vegetable oil. Heat the pan on medium high. Divide the pork mixture into 8 equal portions. Working in batches, drop each portion into the hot pan, spacing them as not to crowd the pan. Pat them down with the back of a spoon to form them into patties. Cook the patties, turning once, for 4 to 5 minutes per side, until golden brown.

Serve the pork burgers with Dijon mustard.

Serves 4.

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Showing 4 of 26 Comments

  • Susan at Food "Blogga"

    It’s always a pleasure to learn about different culinary traditions and cultures. Thanks for sharing the story.

  • Helle

    Great to see recipies from my home country – in Danish they are called frikadeller. We very often eat them with warm pickled red cabbage or cucumber salad.

  • Dena

    Adding to Caleb’s comment…My husband is from the Quad Cities (Illinois) and so I have become very familiar with Boetje’s mustard. I have never seen such commotion about a mustard, but I must say it is quite tasty. We always have to stock up when we visit his hometown, as we live in MS with no Boetje’s mustard. If you haven’t tried it, Elise, you must.

    Thanks for this recipe. It looks wonderful. I can’t wait to try it!

  • LLF

    You can also purchase Boetje’s mustard (in smaller quantities) through The Mustard Museum. http://www.mustardmuseum.com/

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