Ling Cod with Tomato and Orange

We recently found this recipe using halibut in Real Simple magazine and decided to give it a go, but with ling cod instead. Mom and I loved it, dad wasn’t so sure. For me, it was reminiscent of our favorite fish stew and was just as good the next day.

Ling Cod with Tomato and Orange Recipe

  • Yield: Serves 4-6.

Ingredients

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup green olives, pitted and halved
  • 2 Tbsp grated orange zest
  • 2 medium navel oranges, peeled, segmented, membranes removed
  • 1 28-oz can diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 lbs ling cod or cod fillets, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup of fresh dill, chopped, or 1 Tbsp dried dill

Method

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1 Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté for 5 minutes, until softened. Add the olives, orange zest, orange segments, tomatoes, salt and pepper. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes.

lingcod-orange-tomato-3.jpg lingcod-orange-tomato-4.jpg

2 Add the fish to the pan. Spoon sauce over the fish. Cover and cook for an additional 7 minutes, until the fish is just cooked through. Sprinkle with dill and serve.

19 Comments

  1. Martine la banlieusarde

    This looks sooooo delicious! You almost make me crave for fish, and it’s only breakfast time ;-)

  2. house wren

    Hi Elise.

    I just want to remind your readers that overfishing is an environmental problem whose solution is in people’s hands every time they buy seafood. Here is some helpful information from the Monterey Bay Aquarium that you might want to include with this recipe:

    If you choose to use Halibut, be sure to buy wild-caught Pacific Halibut, not trawl-caught Atlantic Halibut.

    When is comes to Cod, the only sustainable harvest comes from hook-and-line catch Pacific Cod and hook-and-line Sablefish/Black Cod.

    More excellent consumer information on the impact of over fishing and what fish to avoid and which varieties to eat can be found on the Monteray Bay Aquarium web site. They also have an excellent pocket guide there that you can print out and keep in your purse to refer to at the supermarket or restaurant.

  3. Garrett

    I am usually wary of fish, especially fish stews. They and I have a rocky history. Plus, it’s harder to get REALLY fresh fish here in the Sac area, rather than in SF (where they just have to walk down the street. i hope they appreciate it).

  4. beckiwithani

    Welcome back!

    This recipe looks wonderful. Do you think it would work with lemon zest and maybe just a little bit of lemon instead of the orange zest and navel oranges? I think I’ll try it and see…

  5. Sassy J

    I made this recipe this past weekend using red snapper and cod. Although it was an interesting combination–for me and my boyfriend the olives, tomatoe, fish, onion part was great–but the orange was an odd element. I would not make it again with the orange.

  6. Nina Zimmermann

    Yum! I have tried this today and it was delicious! I had not expected the flavours to mix so well. Maybe I let it simmer a little too long – the orange segments were nearly dissolved and the orange taste was slightly too dominant. Still it was very good, and I will surely cook it again – maybe with a little less orange, but certainly not without. Thank you, Elise!

  7. Katerina

    Oh, this sounds great. I love the combination of olives and oranges and frequently make a Batali lamb shank recipe that calls for black olives and oranges. So good. I will totally try this as a way to dress up some white fish!

    Thanks!

  8. Cassie

    Not only a great fish soup recipe but also with pictures! :) Well done!

    I love having fish soup but I never dared trying making any myself, save for Japanese fish stock for miso soup.

    Do you think your soup could work without the tomatoes and using a cream base instead? I’ll give it a try and let you know.

    Thanks for the recipe :)

  9. Rosie

    Hi Elise, this is the first recipe I’ve made from your site since discovering it a little over a month ago and it didn’t disappoint. With the exception of the addition of fresh dill at the end, I followed it to the letter. We served it over jasmine rice cooked in coconut milk; it was a great counterbalance to the bright flavors in the stew. Just what we needed on this dreary, rainy Monday. Thank you!

  10. Naomi

    Great recipe w/ a few minor changes…I omitted the oranges (per previous feedback) and only added 2 tsp. of orange zest and it was good…I can’t imagine two full oranges in the recipe. In addition, next time I’ll cut the amount of olives in half, as they can be a bit salty.

  11. Lois

    What a delicious dish. Me and my boyfriend just bought some ling and didn’t know what to do with it… but you came to the rescue! We didn’t add the dill at the end I’m afraid-as we didn’t have any. I found the olives really really complimentary to the dish. The orange segments had dissolved by the time of serving but there was a distinct orange/zesty taste. Very tasty, a lot of complimentary flavours combined. Also very simple! Thankyou!!!

  12. Kelly

    Thanks for the innovative recipes and lovely photographs. Will try it for Passover, since not all guests like the traditional gefilte fish. Sounds simple and delicious, and here in the Mediterranean area all ingredients are readily available.

  13. Guy

    I loved this recipes. What style would you call this? It seems to have a little Mediterranean Spain feel?

    It does, doesn’t it? With the orange zest that gives it a Spanish touch. ~Elise

  14. Steve Raw

    I thought this was just odd. Loved the idea of it, but when it came to eating it, it tastes aweful. The fish just doesnt’ work with the oranges and olives. Sorry!

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