Meatballs with Ricotta in Tomato Sauce

Do you like Italian meatballs? I’ve been fishing around for a while for a good meatball recipe and have found it in this one. The basic idea is to take a base of ground pork, mix in other meat such as ground beef, pork fat, pancetta or prosciutto, add herbs, bread cubes, ricotta cheese and eggs, then brown them on high heat in the oven, add some crushed tomatoes and cook on lower heat until they are done. The following is an adaptation from a couple recipes from San Francisco’s A16 restaurant (the book A16: Food + Wine and an A16 recipe in Food and Wine). We used half ground pork and half Italian sweet sausage, with some minced prosciutto for these meatballs. Sausage because of the seasoning and the higher fat content which will help keep the meatballs from drying out. The ricotta helps as a binder and also helps smooth out the texture and enrich the flavor.

We’re meatball lovers here, so if you have a favorite meatball recipe to share, please let us know about it in the comments.

Meatballs with Ricotta in Tomato Sauce Recipe

  • Yield: Serves 5-6.

If fresh basil is not available, add a tablespoon of dried basil to the tomatoes before adding to the meatballs. Alternatively, Muir Glen makes a canned tomato with basil in it which would also work.

Yum

Ingredients

  • 10 ounces ground pork shoulder
  • 10 ounces sweet Italian sausage, removed from casing
  • 2 ounces prosciutto or pancetta, minced (helps to put in freezer for 15 min first, before mincing, will make it easier to cut)
  • 4 cups cubed white bread, crusts removed first.
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons Kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup ricotta cheese
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • Olive oil
  • 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes (high quality, either San Marzano or Muir Glen)
  • 1/4 cup chiffonaded* fresh basil leaves
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese


* to chiffonade basil leaves, stack leaves on top of each other, then roll up leaves lengthwise like a cigar, slice thinly starting at the end.

Method

1 In a large bowl, add the pork, Italian sausage, prosciutto or pancetta, bread cubes, parsley, oregano, fennel, red pepper flakes, and salt. Use your hands to mix until the ingredients are evenly distributed. Do not over-work.

2 Whisk the beaten eggs and ricotta together in a separate bowl until there are no more large clumps of ricotta. Pour into the bowl of the meat mixture. Mix with your hands until just incorporated. Again, do not over-mix.

If you want, to test seasoning, you can take a small bit of the mix, form into a patty, and heat in a small skillet on the stovetop until cooked through. Depending on how this test patty tastes to you, add more herbs, chili, or salt to taste to the meat mixture. Keep meat mixture in refrigerator while doing this.

3 Preheat oven to 425°F. Coat the bottom of a large roasting pan with olive oil. Form meatballs in your hand, about 1 1/2-inches in diameter, using about 3 Tbsp of the mixture to form each meatball. Arrange in pan so there is some space between them. If too crowded they will steam and not brown.

4 Roast meatballs in the oven for about 30 minutes, turning the meatballs after about 20 minutes, until the meatballs are beginning to brown.

5 Remove pan from oven. Use a metal spatula to dislodge meatballs from being stuck to the bottom of the pan. Add the crushed tomatoes to the pan. Carefully cover the pan with aluminum foil (carefully because the pan is still hot!) Return the pan to the oven. Lower the heat to 300°F. Cook for an additional hour to 1 1/2 hours.

Sprinkle basil into sauce before serving.

Makes about 24 meatballs. Top with grated Parmesan.

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Showing 4 of 45 Comments

  • mary

    I LOVE meatballs. I grew up on meatball subs from the corner sub shop. These look delicious. My mom makes meatballs (I need to get her recipe), but I’ve always been intrigued by adding pork (instead of just all beef).

  • Cecelia

    I have found that my ideal meatballs involve half ground veal and half sirloin, and absolutely require stale bread soaked in milk. The recipe I use is an adaptation of one found on Epicurious (here: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Classic-Spaghetti-and-Meatballs-105546)

    Soak 3 1x3x5″ slices stale bread in milk for ~10 minutes. Meanwhile, combine 1 egg, 2 tbsp grated Parmesan, 1 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp pepper, 1 minced garlic clove, few dashes red pepper flakes, 1/2 tbsp Italian seasoning, and 1 tbsp minced fresh parsley in food processor. Pulse few times to combine. Squeeze bread pieces until almost dry and add to food processor in large chunks (discard rest of milk). Pulse until incorporated (about 20 seconds). Mix in 0.5 lb ground veal and 0.5 lb ground sirloin and mix on medium about 30 seconds or until just combined. Shape into ~1 tbsp rounded meatballs (makes about 24-30). Either fry on stovetop or bake at 350 degrees for 20-25 minutes.

    I often make a double batch and freeze the remainder for quick, luxurious post-work meals.

    Thanks for the recipe! ~Elise

  • FSK

    I LOVE meatballs! I also sneak in some veggies into like grated zucchini or carrots. Nice healthy kick and also helps to retain the moisture in the meatballs… I am already salivating..haha!

  • Michael

    You have all the bases covered, and I’m certain they will be great. I have two suggestions: Drain the ricotta, and use a lower heat to cook the meatballs, else they dry out.

    Also, I’d use a French or Italian bread instead of the (ugh) American loaf. What’s wrong with crust? it’s good for you. Bon Appetit!
    Michael

    Hi Michael, we do use French or Italian loaf, the crust on those tends to be a little hard, so it makes it easier to combine with the meat if the crust is removed (saved for making bread crumbs). The meatballs are cooked after browning at 300°F, covered, in the sauce, and they do not dry out. ~Elise

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