Panaché

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Hello my friends, you are just going to have to trust me on this one. The first time I had a panaché (pan nah SHAY), a popular French drink that is simply a combination of a light beer and a citrusy soda like 7-Up, it was in Orlando at Disney World, on a typically hot May afternoon.

My friends and I had been wandering the park for hours. My legs were tired. I was tired. If I had been 3 years old I would have been on the verge of meltdown requiring a nap or time-out.

My dear French sweetheart found us a table in the shade and ventured off, returning with a platter of glasses filled with ice, a few beers, and a few cans of 7-Up. Now, if the thought of mixing 7-Up with beer makes your head want to explode, you’re not alone.

But we were tired, our resistance down. We had a taste and with it, every reservation vanished. I can now tell you that on a hot day, there is no better drink in the world.

Panaché

Why? Because a panaché is truly refreshing. Not cloying sweet like straight soda. You can drink several glasses before you even notice that there is a touch of alcohol from the beer in it. In France it isn’t usually served with ice (in general ice in drinks isn’t as popular in Europe as it is here) but in my Frenchman’s opinion, it’s even better with ice, and I agree.

I was going to wait until Bastille Day to share this with you, it being a French favorite and all. But here we are, it’s 104°F (40°C) in Sacramento today, and is forecast to be well over 100°F all week. Our friends in Arizona have it even worse (117° in Phoenix, yikes!). Wherever you are, stay cool. And try a panaché!

Update: Many readers have commented that this combination is known as a “Shandy” in many parts of the English speaking world, and goes by other names in other countries as well. ~Elise 

Panaché

Panaché Recipe

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  • Prep time: 1 minute

The proportions can vary from 1/4 beer to a 1/2 beer, with the rest being 7-up or Sprite. Just make sure you use a light (not dark) beer. It doesn't have to be a "lite" beer, though that would work too.

Ingredients

  • 1 part beer (not a dark beer, but a light one, like a Bud, or Miller)
  • 1 to 3 parts 7-up or Sprite

Method

Fill a large glass with ice. Pour beer into the glass to the  quarter-way to half-way mark, depending on the proportions you prefer. Top with 7-up or Sprite. Drink.

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Panaché

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Showing 4 of 99 Comments

  • Camilius Amevorku

    well this is my first time taking panache and I had to take four bottles nonstop…wow its so refreshing and irrestible!

  • carole

    Oh…I’ve just read the comment left by Mark Krom..
    in France beer+lemonade (Panache) mixed with grenadine cordial/syrup is called a “Monaco”.
    Used to drink that quite a bit as a Teenager :)
    but I think it’s gone out of fashion now..

  • carole

    Hya
    I’m French..but been living in London,UK for about 20 years..
    so yes it’s called Panache in French & Shandy in England..
    but usually Panache is not beer mixed with seven up but beer mixed with
    lemonade pure and simple…well..unless they’ve changed the recipie since I left France 20 years ago! ;-)

  • Marcel Krom

    In holland we can buy Shandy (0,1%Alc) and Radler (2,5%Alc) in store. But the mixture was already known in bars by the name Sneeuwwitje (Snowwhite). This is indeed lager and 7-up. There is also a mixture of lager and grenadine (lemonade) wich is called Amerikaantje (American).

  • Serge Lescouarnec

    Elise,

    In my book a real French ‘Panaché’ is made with French lemonade and beer.

    Bonsoir

    Serge

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