Steak Salad

Steak salad is such a great way to enjoy steak. You can even easily put it together with steak leftovers. At a minimum it is simply thin slices of steak over salad greens with your preferred salad dressing. I tend to spiff mine up a bit with whatever we might have on hand – walnuts, goat cheese, pomegranate seeds, kumquats, etc., depending on what’s in season. Arugula is a particularly good complement to steak, though the pepperiness of the arugula can at times be a little too much if not mixed in with some other salad greens.

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Steak Salad Recipe

  • Prep time: 10 minutes
  • Cook time: 10 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4.

No need to bring the steak to room temp before cooking. You sear on such high heat, and the steaks are so thin, it's actually better to cook the steak while it is still relatively chilled, if you want the centers to be rare.

Ingredients

  • Olive oil, canola oil, or grapeseed oil
  • 1 lb skirt steak or flank steak
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 head lettuce greens
  • 1 bunch of arugula, young leaves, tough stems removed
  • 1/2 of one red bell pepper, thinly sliced lengthwise and cut into 1-inch long pieces
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Several toasted walnuts, chopped
  • 4 oz goat cheese, crumbled
  • Pomegranate seeds or thinly sliced kumquats (optional)
  • 2 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • Salt and Pepper

Method

1 Heat a couple teaspoons of cooking oil in a cast iron pan on high heat. Pat the steaks dry. Sprinkle with a little salt. Sear the steaks in the pan on both sides, just until nicely browned. Remove from pan to a cutting board. Let rest for a few minutes before cutting. Slice thin slices, against the grain of the meat.

2 Toss together the lettuce greens, arugula, bell pepper, and scallions. Arrange on individual plates. Sprinkle on chopped walnuts. Sprinkle with goat cheese. Lay on top several slices of chilled sliced steak. Sprinkle with pomegranate seeds or sliced kumquats if using.

3 Mix together the lemon juice, olive oil, and a dash of salt and pepper. Drizzle on salad.

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6 Comments

  1. Amy

    I completely agree. I like my steak rare, so reheating it just tends to overcook it. Using it on a salad allows me to stretch what little I have left over and tastes great!

  2. jonathan

    hi elise – i’ve tried a lot of your recipes lately. simple….delicious. it’s all about the quality of the ingredients anyway, true? i’ve made a version of this salad in the summer (lots of grilled steak left over in the summer, eh?) substituting grilled peaches for the kumquats. maybe a very light raspberry vinaigrette to go on it? yummmmmmm……..

  3. Miss Tenacity

    I just made steak salad today! I will rarely use leftover steak and rather just grill up some flank steak purchased expressly for salads to a crusty bloody rare and then drop the juicy shreds over a huge bowl of romaine and chopped red peppers. Yum! :-)

  4. pegs

    I always hope for good leftover steak. You can have a hot or cold steak sandwich with various condiments, or a delicious salad. Tonight I think I will toss a bag of salad greens with an avacoda, some spring onions and some canned mandarine oranges (wish I had fresh oranges). And if I have some black olives in the frige I’ll toss them in (always check your leftovers when making a salad). But first I mix some good balsamic vinegar and good olive oil — plus sea or kosher salt and fresh ground pepper — in the bottom of my wooden salad bowl. At the last minute I might throw in some nuts and/or ripe cheese. Heat a loaf of bread to serve with salad. Good bread and good salad — what more can you want. A bottle of good wine!!!! My husband and I look forward to these “leftovers.”

  5. Elise Lafosse

    Hi Elise,

    I have been meaning to tell you for awhile that this steak salad has become a staple in my household. I must make it once at least every two weeks. It is quick and easy and good, and when I just am not that creative when it comes to figuring out a meal, I always rely on this, this recipe and the seared tuna recipe as well. Thank you for making my life a little easier with this recipe.

    Elise

  6. Cheryl

    Hey there,

    I absolutely enjoy your reading your recipes. However, where I live, arugula is not readily available. I was just curious what type of vegetables you can substitute it with?

    Fresh baby spinach, though the taste isn’t even close to the same. Arugula also goes by “rocket”. It grows like a weed, even more persistent than dandelions, so if you can get a hold of some seed, and have an untended patch of dirt somewhere, if you sow them you’ll get an unlimited yearly supply (when in season). ~Elise

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