Tangerine Sorbet

Winter is the season for tangerines and other mandarin oranges. There’s something wonderfully comforting about enjoying a big bowl of ripe, juicy, sweet mandarins in the middle of dismal, dreary winter. Walking around the neighborhood, oranges stand out like light bulbs against their bushy green trees among most of the other trees, now skeletal from the cold. If you love the flavor of tangerines as much as I do, mandarins are available by the box load at most markets, and Odwalla makes an excellent fresh tangerine juice that you can only buy now, during winter. Either makes a refreshing, light sorbet. Homemade ice creams and sorbets tend to be icy, because they don’t have the stabilizers in them that commercial products have. So, they usually need to be eaten the day they are made, unless you add alcohol or corn syrup to them to help keep them smooth for a day or two more (they will eventually get icy). In this case, I couldn’t think of any alcohol to add that wouldn’t detract from the tangerine flavor, so I added a tablespoon of corn syrup (could add more), which helped to keep it from being too icy the next day. Still, it was better the first day, and more snow-like the second.

Tangerine Sorbet Recipe

  • Yield: Makes a little less than one quart.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups fresh tangerine juice (or juice from mandarin oranges)
  • 3 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp corn syrup (optional)

Method

1 Pour tangerine juice through a fine mesh sieve into a large bowl. Use a rubber spatula to press as much juice as you can through the sieve, discard remaining pulp.

2 Add lemon juice, sugar, and (optional) corn syrup to the bowl. Stir with a spoon until the sugar has completely dissolved.

3 Process in an ice cream maker according to manufacturer's instructions.

Serve immediately, or chill for a few hours. Best eaten the day it's made.

Links:
How to make ice cream without a machine - tips by David Lebovitz.

28 Comments

  1. jonathan

    “Tangerine, she is all they claim. With her eyes of night and lips as bright as flame…” – Francis Albert Sinatra, 1962

    My Mom would play that song over and over and over and…

    You don’t think a quick shot of a neutral, high-quality vodka might work with this? Kinda like a Screwdriver Sorbet?

    Time to drag out the KitchenAid freeze bowl :p

  2. Mari

    The image alone made my mouth water and I swear I can taste it right this minute.

  3. Anna

    Amazing. Simply Amazing.

  4. taiyyaba

    Beautiful picture, Elise!

    Thanks Taiyyaba! ~Elise

  5. cookin@home

    I would think a shot of absolute citron or even X-Rated vodka would go well. X-Rated is grapefruit flavored.

  6. Elise

    Regarding the addition of alcohol, I would try mixing some with tangerine juice to see what it tastes like un-churned first, and if the taste works for you, go for it. Vodka might work. If you eat it the same day you make it though, you don’t need to add any alcohol to it.

  7. Scott at Realepicurean

    A sorbet is great between courses to refresh the palate. The best I ever had was a tomato sorbet – people always forget that tomato is a fruit and can be used as such!

  8. Sylvie, Rappahannock Cook & Kitchen Gardener

    Unless the sorbet is to be served to people who do not drink alcohol, I always use one or two tablespoons of quality liqueur, either with a complimentary flavor (kirsch with cherry sorbet; triple sec with orange; limoncello with lemon etc) or plain vodka. Works very well. This allows me to make lots sorbets in summer when summer fruit are abundant and full of flavor, and eat them weeks or even months later (my little stash of frozen treats, you know, for when a I need a little vitamin boost in the dark of winter…).

  9. Marjy

    During my aunt’s last couple of months, the only food she consistently had a desire to eat was lemon sorbet. I think she would have been even happier to have a bowl of this! This sounds especially appealing this weekend, since we’re having a Santa Ana condition right now, and it’s 78° and dry here in San Diego.

  10. Eliza Domestica

    This looks refreshing! I have been wanting to make sorbet lately so I think I will give this one a try. Thanks.

  11. Deborah Dowd

    I have a ton of tangelos from the holidays- I would assume I could use them as well. I love sorbet, even when it is cold!

  12. Cynthia

    Thanks for the recipe. I have a tangerine tree and it’s overflowing with tangerines, so I’ve been looking for ways to use the fruit.

  13. Tabitha (From Single to Married)

    I love that this is so easy to make and I can’t think of a better flavor to try than tangerines!

  14. Cenk

    Looks delicious. I just churned yet another batch of pomegranate sorbet. I’m going to try this next. Do you think Cointreau will work nicely? Since it is orange flavored, it might not detract from the tangerine flavor too much… Thanks for the recipe!

  15. alina

    I’ve been thinking of dusting off the ice cream machine and giving it a spin. It usually hibernates during the winter months. This recipe is certainly enticing me further. And that photo at the top is simply stunning. Love it.

  16. dick

    One of my favorite palate cleanser is a small scoop of raspberry sorbet with cranberry juice and a crushed mint leaf. Love it! I just crush the mint leaf with half a tsp of sugar. Put the small scoop of raspberry sorbet in the glass with the crushed mint and then add enough cranberry juice to go half way up the sorbet.

    I would imagine it would work with almost any berry sorbet as well. Your mouth will thank you.

  17. Mickey

    Does this recipe work with any citrus? Lemons? Clementines?

    With lemons I would use Meyer lemons (see our Meyer lemon sorbet, and yes clementines should work as is. We use grapefruit juice in our champagne sorbet. ~Elise

  18. imran

    Hi… this looks awesome. I’ll have to try when my mandarins ripen.

    I’ve used a raw egg mixed in to keep a sorbet smooth and prevent iciness (in that case it was a raspberry sorbet). it seemed strange at the time, but it worked and didn’t detract from the flavor.

  19. Jesse Gardner

    What a beautiful photo! Looks almost like an egg, sunny-side up.

  20. Hope

    I am going to try this! I have had the ice cream maker for my Kitchen Aid mixer for awhile and haven’t had the time and patience to use it much.

    I may use agave nectar instead of corn syrup.

  21. Sean

    Despite my famous dislike of orange, I do rather enjoy tangerines. Why? Cuz I’m weird. Anyway, I’ll have to try this!

  22. Madeline

    Your photo is beautiful. Those colors are just stunning. I’m so happy you included the David Lebovitz link. I was bummed that I don’t have an ice cream maker and I really want to make this. I’m assuming the same technique he uses for ice cream will apply to this sorbet.

  23. Susan from Food Blogga

    Citrus is really popping up everywhere here now. Tangerines, clementines, blood oranges, grapefruit…. What a delicious way to highlight their inherent beauty and flavor.

  24. Rebecca Reid

    I made sorbet for the first time last week. It was so easy and good! This sounds like another one!

  25. Carolyn Kumpe

    Try Grappa another neutral spirit. Nice recipe with beautiful photo.

  26. Diane

    I tried your Cranberry Sorbet over Christmas and it was a huge hit. Everyone preferred it to traditionsl Christmas desserts. So I thought I would try this Tangerine Sorbet for a dinner party and again, a sensational hit. These are the lightest and tasty desserts and everyone is happy with just one small scoop because they are so tasty!

  27. Jeanne

    Oh – I can almost taste that!! Such a gorgeous colour too.

  28. John Kaay

    Oh My – is this good! I took your advice and used the Odwalla Tangerine juice – you never know what you’re getting with fresh tangerines.
    Publish more ice cream and sorbet recipes!

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