Chicken Tamales with Chile Verde

Invite your family and friends into the kitchen to help assemble these homemade chicken tamales!

Two Plates of Chicken Tamales with Chile Verde Broken in Half to Show the Filling and Topped with Crema, Cotija Cheese, and Cilantro at a Table Setting with a Platter of More Tamales, Utensils, a Small Bowl of Cotija Cheese, a Small Bowl of Crema, a Glass of Water, and a Small Vase

Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

Chile verde or green chile chicken tamales are one of the most popular tamales served during the holidays in Mexican and Mexican American homes like mine, especially on Christmas Eve. The tamales are usually served with rice, beans, crema to tame off the heat, and a warm mug of creamy champurrado. It’s an iconic holiday meal! 

The beauty of these chicken tamales is that the filling is versatile and easy to prepare. All you need is time for assembling the tamales and a little patience while the tamales steam.

A Plate of Chicken Tamales with Chile Verde Broken in Half to Show the Filling at a Table Setting with a Platter of More Tamales, Utensils, a Small Bowl of Cotija Cheese, a Small Bowl of Crema, a Glass of Water, and a Small Vase

Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

The Best Tip for the Most Flavorful Tamales

The chile verde gives the tamales their delicious flavor. It’s made by blending tomatillos, serrano and jalapeño peppers, cilantro, and onions until finely chopped. Here’s a trick: strain the salsa through a fine mesh sieve to remove some liquid. Only the remaining pulp is used in the filling. This keeps the tamales from getting too wet. They’ll be perfectly flavored and evenly cooked.

How to Buy and Store Dried Corn Husks for Tamales

Dried corn husks typically come in a bag of about 50 husks. That’s enough for 20 to 24 tamales. The remaining husks are used to line the steamer and tamales as they cook, and for pulling strips for tying the tamales. Look for husks that appear clean and free of debris, and that don’t have holes all over. 

Unused husks can be stored in a dry place for up to 1 year, so make sure to only wash the husks you will be using—no need to dump the entire bag into water. Once it gets wet, you have to use it. 

Platter of Chicken Tamales with Salsa Verde Surrounded by Two Plates with a Serving of Tamales and Small Bowls with Cotija Cheese, Crema, and Two Glasses with Lemon Water

Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

How to Make Tamales with Chicken or Pork

This is a chicken tamale recipe, but you can also make it with pork. I would recommend using pork shoulder cut into large cubes. Boil the pork for about 1 hour 45 minutes with the onion and salt, as the recipe calls for, but add a bay leaf, a few cloves of garlic, and 6 black peppercorns. The pork should be tender enough to easily shred. The rest of the instructions are the same!

The Best Way to Reheat Tamales 

I recommend microwaving leftovers until heated through with or without the husk on. It’s truly the easiest way to reheat tamales. My favorite way to reheat tamales? On a comal or skillet until the husk gets lightly charred. The tamale will get crispy edges. Then, top it with a fried egg. It’s THE best! 

How To Plan Ahead for a Large Gathering

Need to plan ahead or are you making a large amount of tamales for a gathering? Assemble the tamales up to 3 months ahead, wrap them individually with parchment paper, and freeze them in zip top freezer bags, uncooked. Steam the tamales one day before you plan to serve them, cooked directly from the freezer with the parchment paper wrap still on. Simply add an extra hour of cooking time.

A Plate of Chicken Tamales with Chile Verde Topped with Crema, Cotija Cheese, and Some Cilantro at a Table Setting with a Platter of More Tamales, Utensils, a Small Bowl of Cotija Cheese, a Small Bowl of Crema, a Glass of Water, and a Small Vase

Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

Chicken Tamales with Chile Verde

Prep Time 60 mins
Cook Time 2 hrs 15 mins
Soak Time 2 hrs
Total Time 5 hrs 15 mins
Servings 12 servings
Yield 24 tamales

Look for corn husks that appear clean and free of debris. You also want to make sure they aren’t torn or are full of holes.

For less spicy tamales, reduce the amount of serrano or jalapeño peppers or remove their membrane and seeds before using. 

I recommend making the masa for tamales after you make the chile verde in step 3. Use the reserved chicken stock from cooking the chicken.

Ingredients

  • 1 (8-ounce) package corn husks (see Recipe Note) 

  • 2 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts

  • 1 medium white onion, peeled and halved, divided

  • 10 cups water

  • 3 teaspoons salt, divided

  • 1 1/2 pounds tomatillos, husk removed, rinsed, and roughly chopped

  • 7 serrano peppers, stems removed and roughly chopped (see Recipe Note)

  • 1 jalapeno peppers, stems removed and roughly chopped (see Recipe Note)

  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled

  • Small bunch cilantro (about 1 1/2 cups tightly packed)

  • 6 cups masa for tamales (see Recipe Note)

For serving

  • Crema or sour cream

  • Cotija cheese, crumbled

  • Cilantro, roughly chopped

Method

  1. Soak the corn husks:

    Rinse the corn husks thoroughly under warm running water to clean off any debris, being careful not to tear them. Place the rinsed husks in a large bowl with enough warm water to cover them. Use a heavy bowl or plate to weigh the husks down so that they stay submerged. I use the tejolote from my molcajete. Soak the husks for at least 2 hours so that they soften and become pliable. 

    Simple Tip!

    You will need the entire package of corn husks. It will feel like there are too many! You’ll need some to assemble the tamales, to make strips to tie the tamales, and to line the steamer for cooking the tamales.

    Corn Husks in a Bowl of Warm Water and Held Down with a Tejolote

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

  2. Cook the chicken:

    Combine the chicken, half of the onion (reserve the other half for the chile verde), 10 cups water, and 1 teaspoon salt in a medium pot or Dutch oven over high heat. Bring it to a boil and then reduce the heat to medium to cook the chicken for 45 minutes, uncovered. Use a large spoon to skim off any foam that rises to the top. Remove the pot from the heat.

    Use tongs to transfer the chicken onto a large plate and shred them using your hands once they are cool enough to handle. Cover and set it aside. 

    Strain the chicken stock through a colander into a bow or jar, and keep it refrigerated until ready to use. You can discard the onion. The chicken stock can be used to make the masa.

    Chicken Breast and Onions in a Dutch Oven Filled with Water for Chicken Tamales with Chile Verde Recipe

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Platter of Shredded Chicken Next to a Cast Iron Pot with Chicken Stock for Chicken Tamales Recipe

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Chicken Stock in a Mason Jar and the Leftovers in the Dutch Oven

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

  3. Make the chile verde: 

    While the chicken cooks, make the chile verde. Add the tomatillos, serrano and jalapeño peppers, garlic, cilantro, the remaining half onion, roughly chopped, and 2 teaspoons salt into a blender or food processor. Blend or pulse it until finely chopped—you don’t want large chunks nor do you want it to be creamy like a smoothie. You may need to do this in two batches if your blender or food processor is small. 

    Strain the salsa through a fine mesh sieve set over a bowl and discard the liquid. You can use a spoon to push the liquid through the sieve. Reserve only the pulp—this is your chile verde.

    Simple Tip!

    This is when I would make the masa, using the chicken stock reserved from cooking the chicken.

    Chile Verde Ingredients Minced in a Blender

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Chile Verde Strained Using a Colander and Pressed with a Spoon

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

  4. Assemble the tamales:

    Set up for assembling the tamales: You’ll need the soaked husks (keep them in the water), the masa, the shredded chicken, and the chile verde. 

    Lay a husk on a flat surface, smooth-side up and the pointy side away from you. Scoop about 1/3 cup masa and use a spoon to spread it onto the wider bottom half of the husk, leaving a 1/2-inch border around the bottom and side edges. Place about 1/3 cup shredded chicken and 2 tablespoons chile verde on the center of the masa. If you have a small husk, you may need to use less masa, chicken, and chile verde.

    There are two options for folding the tamale

    The first option is to fold the husk in half lengthwise. Then, fold it half again lengthwise. Fold the pointy end up towards the wider end, and fasten with a strip of corn husk by tying it around the tamale so that it stays folded.

    The second option is to fold one of the long sides over the filling, but not all the way to the other side. Then fold the other long side over it and fold the pointy end up towards the wider end. Fasten with a strip of corn husk tied around the tamale. 

    Simple Tip!

    I use torn or ugly-looking husks to make the strips that will be used to tie the tamales. Use your fingers to tear them along the fibers. If they are too short to wrap around the tamales, you can tie 2 strips together to create a longer one. 

    I prefer the first option because I find it easier. Plus, the cooked tamale unwraps with more ease. Both methods are acceptable—it’s a matter of preference. 

    Repeat until all the masa and filling are used. You will get about 24 tamales.

    Masa Spread on a Corn Husk and in the Surrounding, Bowls of Ingredients (Masa, Corn Husks, Chile Verde, and Shredded Chicken)

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Making the Tamales: Shredded Chicken Added on Top of Masa

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Making the Tamales: Chile Verde Added on Top of the Shredded Chicken

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Making the Tamales the Corn Husk Folded Vertically in Half over the Fillings

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Making the Tamales: Corn Husk Folded Vertically in Half Again

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Making the Tamales: Narrow End of Corn Husk Folded Vertically onto the Tamale

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Making the Tamales: Tamales Secured by Tying a Strip of Corn Husk

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

  5. Prepare the steamer:

    Add water to a large steamer pot to the fill line, or until it comes up about 3 inches up the sides. Place the steamer basket on top. This is the steamer I own, but you can use any large steamer pot you own.

    Simple Tip!

    Add two pennies to the water. They will notify you when the water begins to boil and when it has fully evaporated. When the pennies begin to lightly rattle, it means the water is boiling and you can set the timer. When the rattling becomes very loud, the water has fully evaporated, and you will need to add more. Keep a kettle of hot water next to the steamer. When adding water to the pot, make sure not to spill it on the tamales.

    Line the steamer basket with a layer of husks. If your steamer is large like mine, place a heat-proof bowl upside down in the center. This will help keep tamales from tipping over. Place the tamales in the steamer basket upright, leaning against each other, the bowl (if using), and the pot. Cover the tamales with any remaining corn husks and then a clean kitchen towel. Cover the pot tightly with the lid.

    Two Pennies in a Large Pot of Water

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    In the Pot, a Large Steamer Lined with Corn Husks

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    A Bowl Placed in the Middle of the Steamer and Tamales Placed around the Bowl in the Upright Position

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Tamales in Steamer Covered in Corn Husks

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

    Steamer Covered in a Kitchen Towel and then the Top to the Pot for Chicken Tamales Recipe

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

  6. Cook the tamales:

    Cook the tamales over medium-high heat. When the water comes to a boil, set the timer for 90 minutes. Check the water periodically to make sure it hasn’t fully evaporated, every 15 minutes—you may need to add more hot water. 

    After 90 minutes, turn off the heat and let the tamales rest for 20 minutes in the steamer. 

    To check for doneness, carefully remove a tamale from the pot with tongs and unwrap it. The husk should easily detach from masa.

    Serve the tamales with a dollop of crema and a sprinkle of cotija cheese and chopped cilantro. 

    Store leftovers in the fridge for up to 4 days. The microwave is the best way to reheat tamales. 

    Cooked tamales can be frozen for about 6 months. After cooking the tamales, let them cool completely. Then, pack them in zip top freezer bags for storage. 

    Did you love the recipe? Leave us stars below!

    A Plate of Chicken Tamales with Chile Verde Topped with Crema, Cotija Cheese, and Some Cilantro at a Table Setting with a Platter of More Tamales, Utensils, a Small Bowl of Cotija Cheese, a Small Bowl of Crema, a Glass of Water, and a Small Vase

    Simply Recipes / Ericka Sanchez

Nutrition Facts (per serving)
408 Calories
6g Fat
53g Carbs
36g Protein
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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 12
Amount per serving
Calories 408
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 6g 8%
Saturated Fat 1g 7%
Cholesterol 80mg 27%
Sodium 612mg 27%
Total Carbohydrate 53g 19%
Dietary Fiber 6g 21%
Total Sugars 4g
Protein 36g
Vitamin C 10mg 52%
Calcium 115mg 9%
Iron 6mg 36%
Potassium 636mg 14%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.
Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate. In cases where multiple ingredient alternatives are given, the first listed is calculated for nutrition. Garnishes and optional ingredients are not included.