No ImageClassic English Toad-in-the-Hole

Did you make it? Rate it!

  1. Buck

    Even though the dish was fine, there just was not enough flavor in the batter. It was like eating lightly brown toast. The batter needed some kind of kick, or at least some flavor. But a good place to start. Was very good with some deli honey mustard and added spices.

    xxxxxyyyyy

  2. Ashley

    Absolutely fab! Big hit with the kids! (I have picky eaters) question though… Any tips on the batter for this and Yorkshire pudding to get it rise properly in the US?

    xxxxxyyyyy

    • Amy

      In England we get the oil smoking hot in the bottom of the dish then add Yorkshire pudding batter to get the rise

    • Emma Christensen

      Hi, Ashley! Make sure your eggs are REALLY well beaten and don’t open the oven door during baking. All the lift comes from the eggs and so steady oven temperature helps them rise evenly. Hope that helps!

  3. LobsterWoman

    I just told my son I was making this again tonight and I got an “Awesome”. Who knew? I made this once before and honestly, it turned out better than the ones I used to make when we lived in England. I was never any good at making Yorkshires (most Brits get Aunt Bessie’s out of the freezer section anyway!) I used a glass pan once but got stopped by a helpful local before I had a disaster. Pan must be just smokin and I used a touch of goose fat in the oil.

    xxxxxyyyyy

  4. Stephanie

    I’ve made this before, but tonight pouring the batter into my Pyrex (might be glass casserole dish) made it shatter into 4 large pieces! Batter all over and inside my oven. It was pouring the cold batter into the hot dish that did it (and yes, I let sit out 1/2 hour). I highly recommend using a metal dish!

    • Elise Bauer

      Hi Stephanie, I’m so sorry that happened! Yes Pyrex can do that at high temperatures, so is probably not the best dish to use for this. I use a ceramic baking dish. I’ll make a note in the recipe.

  5. Michael

    I save beef drippings specifically for this and Yorkshire pudding.

  6. Darren

    The only variation to this recipe that I use is lard. I put lard (real lard, not Crisco) in the dish and pre-heat the dish 450 and have the lard spitting. Once I have mixed the batter by hand, I use an electric whisk. This helps the batter become lighter and usually rises better. I cover my batter and leave in the fridge for at least an hour before using and give it a quick stir before pouring over the sausages. Using lard makes a big difference i the taste, tried using bacon fat, but US bacon is to salty. My whole family loves this, along with my Yorkshire puddings.

  7. Susan

    My 1st effort . It was for an impromtu tea with my son,his wife and our grandie . What fun we had ! Added some bacon bits ,and served it with steamed veges and pasta . Made a self-saucing pudding for unfilled corners . All left table satisfied +++!

  8. Amanda Hart

    I don’t follow this to the letter but I also add a little bit not much about 2 teaspoons of sugar instead of salt to mine. Also I buy the breakfast or the Franks for it that have cheese in them and then sprinkling at the last 15 minutes of cooking some cheese on top. It is amazing and my Step son loves it.

  9. Rick

    Try adding a quarter teaspoon of thyme and another of rosemary to the flour mix. If you want to be a triple-OG-gangster add a smidgen (technical measurement) of poppyseeds. Traditional? No. But wizards will applaud your ingenuity and rebellious nature.

  10. Sharon Monroe

    Love this recipe, but I live in Colorado and cannot get the Yorshire Pudding to rise, any suggestions?

    • Linnea Clayton

      Use self rising flour

    • Ben

      Beat the eggs in really well, let the batter sit an hour. Use a fully heated oven, turned up to 450 at least. Once the sausages are cooked thru and almost burning, get the pan smoking hot, on the top or second upper-most shelf, pour the batter in and close the oven right away.

    • Paul Baggott

      AH, the old, it’s not going to rise problem. I’ll offer you a rise guarantee and it’ll work anywhere. How do I know. I’m English and I’m the king at Toad in the Hole.
      Slight change to the method. Firstly drop the melted butter – you don’t need it. Secondly use four eggs. slightly beat them first but very lightly so they look like snot (excuse me) and only just mixed – its this ‘snot’ that gives the rise. Mix them with the salt and flour but only about two thirds of the milk. Mix to a thick heavy cream consistency. Then add the rest of the milk and any herbs you wish. Now here’s THE way to make it rise. IN your cooking pan (best to use cast iron like Le Crueset if you have but glass can work fine. Put in a quarter inch of oil in the pan – dont worry, most of it will stay in the pan after you remove the Toad. This depth helps ‘fry’ the bottom. Dont just wipe oil round the pan, there needs to be that depth. Now most important of all, heat that pan up hot before you put the batter in. I heat up to 275 degrees centigrade – 527 degrees F!. Then pour the batter in the tray but only to half the hight of the sausage – you’ll get a better rise with less batter. Too thick and it wont cook without burning. Then as soon as you put the pan back in the oven, reduce the temperature to 450 F. DO NOT open the oven for at least half an hour – your Toad will sink. If you have a glass oven you can see the rise and the colour. NOrmally, when it’s done, give it 5 minutes longer for structural integrity. I’d say this receipe would need a good minimum of 35 minuts to cook but maybe 40. The rise shold be minimum of 5 times the height of the base batter level. When done, remove the Toad from the dish – this stops the fat soaking in and I put it on kitchen towel. Then you’re good to go. The result should be succulent sausages and a batter that is crisp like glass with very little ‘pudding’ texture at the bottom. Happy Toading! – The lady above is right btw equal parts flour and eggs and milk by weight.

    • Stefan Nesbitt

      Your best bet would probably to move to Yorkshire.

      But no: in terms of most probable causes: the preheating really helps, including having some oil preheated in the dish. The oven needs to be pre-heated and hot. Also. 2 eggs, 1 cup of flour, 1 cup of milk/water (any ratio you want) is the basic yorkshire pudding mix that should work every time to iron out problems.

      • Nancy Jean

        1-1-2 is the recipe my English grandmother taught my mother, and she taught me. The key is to heat whatever fat you’re using (beef drippings/lard/bacon fat/oil) to ‘spitting’ hot temperature. A dark pan pan helps. if you want a larger batch, (x1 1/2, or x2), keep the ratio the same. I’ve been making it this way for almost 50 years and it never fails.

      • Jan

        I live at high altitude and my Yorkshire pudding recipe is 1 cup AP flour, 1 cup milk, salt, pepper, 3 eggs. Bake in centre of 425 oven. Rises every time.

        • Elise Bauer

          Hi Sharon, great question! I don’t cook at high altitude so don’t know what to tell you. If anyone else reading this has experience who would like to chime in, please do.

          • Paul Baggott

            AH, the old, it’s not going to rise problem. I’ll offer you a rise guarantee and it’ll work anywhere. How do I know. I’m English and I’m the king at Toad in the Hole.

            Slight change to the method. Firstly drop the melted butter – you don’t need it. Secondly use four eggs. slightly beat them first but very lightly so they look like snot (excuse me) and only just mixed – its this ‘snot’ that gives the rise. Mix them with the salt and flour but only about two thirds of the milk. Mix to a thick heavy cream consistency. Then add the rest of the milk and any herbs you wish. Now here’s THE way to make it rise. IN your cooking pan (best to use cast iron like Le Crueset if you have but glass can work fine. Put in a quarter inch of oil in the pan – dont worry, most of it will stay in the pan after you remove the Toad. This depth helps ‘fry’ the bottom. Dont just wipe oil round the pan, there needs to be that depth. Now most important of all, heat that pan up hot before you put the batter in. I heat up to 275 degrees centigrade – 527 degrees F!. Then pour the batter in the tray but only to half the hight of the sausage – you’ll get a better rise with less batter. Too thick and it wont cook without burning. Then as soon as you put the pan back in the oven, reduce the temperature to 450 F. DO NOT open the oven for at least half an hour – your Toad will sink. If you have a glass oven you can see the rise and the colour. NOrmally, when it’s done, give it 5 minutes longer for structural integrity. I’d say this receipe would need a good minimum of 35 minuts to cook but maybe 40. The rise shold be minimum of 5 times the height of the base batter level. When done, remove the Toad from the dish – this stops the fat soaking in and I put it on kitchen towel. Then you’re good to go. The result should be succulent sausages and a batter that is crisp like glass with very little ‘pudding’ texture at the bottom. Happy Toading!

            • Michael

              Try and use beef drippings, the traditional fat.

  11. stephanie gott

    i love this recipe! turns out perfect everytime i use it. i have a friend in the UK and he urged me to make it for my kids. they are 2 and 4 and even these two pickie eaters eat it. i like hashbrowns and country gravy with mine

  12. Debbie Cant Davies

    I always grill my sausages first as i can’t stand the sausage fat taste, I like a standard sausage with no extra flavours and have it with boiled or mashed potatoes and too much veg. that one in the picture would do for two as always have two or three sausages each for a meal, though our sausages are not long ones but about four or five inches long

  13. Patrice

    A great recipe and it made a lovely brekkie!

  14. Stephanie

    Hubz and I going to England in September so I wanted to cook something authentic. I made this with a 14 oz package of Johnsonville New Orleans Style sausage and chicken gravy from a can (I know, I know…) but we loved it and will make again. I could see eating this for breakfast with syrup instead of the gravy, too. I wasn’t comfortable leaving the batter to sit out for 30 minutes since it had eggs and milk, but I know it was to let the bubbles rise out so I just let it sit in the fridge.

  15. Charles D Taylor

    Love the English bangers I get from an English pub here in Iowa, usa. Always wanted to try Toad in the Hole and finally did this past weekend with special guests that I try out my English meals on. We all loved it, wish I knew how to post a picture I took of it but they were beautfiful, cooked just right, with a nice textured Yorkshire like pudding. The recipe at the top was used to a tee and came out perfect. Am so anxious to go get more bangers and maintain Toad in the Hole as at least a monthly specialty. Used Bisto gravy granules which surprisingly was delicious. I dont know how to prepare gravy, and had HB sauce on hand for a backup just in case. Am a 77 year old man that loves English cooking from my many trips to the land of my ancesotrs so am experimenting all the time. Spam Fritters, Bangers and mash, with beans, fried egg on top of the mash or mushy peas.

  16. Simon

    I usually brown the sausages in the oven,in the baking dish, releases the juices and fat from the sausages adds to the flavour of the batter. takes an extra five minutes or so…

  17. Emma

    Currently making this right now, the sides have puffed way up over the top of the glass 9×9 dish and look nicely brown, but the middle is still mushy – what did I do wrong?

View More