No ImageHow to Make Classic Tiramisu

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  1. Shasta C.

    I made this last night and my heavy cream and mascarpone mixture just would not come together! I had one last cup of heavy cream but no mascarpone; I was able to whip that up and add it to the zabaglione, but it just wasn’t enough. I assembled everything, but I know it won’t firm up. Any thoughts on what happened? Both the cream and mascarpone came right out of the fridge.

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  2. Quin

    My only concern is, salmonella and the eggs.

  3. Chris N.

    I just made the recipe and it was very delicious! All my European guests were thrilled about it and my thought was “finally, a real Tiramisu that is made with rum, the way I remember it in Germany” It is unlike any other Tiramisu that I ever tried in the US, even in Italian restaurants in Seattle, which seem trying to please the American community with “no-calorie creams, less taste, and no alcohol but with a ton of sugar” nonsense.

    I did have an issue, though: I am experienced in pastry making and I am very precise in following the recipes. However, this did not come out as firm as I expected it to be. I know, there were some previous comments about the correctness of making the zabaglione and the whipping cream. I did get the consistency of the zabaglione as shown in the picture and whipped the mascarpone with the cream to “firm, not-quite-stiff peaks”. Still, after resting for 24 hours in the fridge, my Tiramisu was barely holding its shape when served. It looked like melting ice cream. But I did notice that after combining the thick zabaglione with the stiff whipping cream, I was assembling the Tiramisu with much softer mixture than the way it originally was. Note: I did not have it sit on the table and used right away. I wanted to ask – what can be done to the recipe to make the cream keep its stiffness? Is adding a bit of gelatin a good idea? Maybe cream of tartar? Thanks!

    xxxxxyyyyy

  4. Chris N.

    I just made the recipe and it was very delicious! All my European guests were thrilled about it and my thought was “finally, a real Tiramisu that is made with rum, the way I remember it in Germany” It it unlike any other Tiramisu that I ever tried in the US, even in Italian restaurants in Seattle, which seem trying to please the American community with “no-calorie creams, less taste, and no alcohol but with a ton of sugar” nonsense.

    I did have an issue, though: I am experienced in pastry making and I am very precise in following the recipes. However, this did not come out as firm as I expected it to be. I know, there were some previous comments about the correctness of making the zabaglione and the whipping cream. I did get the consistency of the zabaglione as shown in the picture and whipped the mascarpone with the cream to “firm, not-quite-stiff peaks”. Still, after resting for 24 hours in the fridge, my Tiramisu was barely holding its shape when served. It looked like melting ice cream. But I did notice that after combining the thick zabaglione with the stiff whipping cream, I was assembling the Tiramisu with much softer mixture than the way it originally was. Note: I did not have it sit on the table and used right away. I wanted to ask – what can be done to the recipe to make the cream keep its stiffness? Is adding a bit of gelatin a good idea? Maybe cream of tartar? Thanks!

    xxxxxyyyyy

    Show Replies (1)
  5. N.S.

    For a last minute celebration dessert for visiting family, this recipe was just what I needed. I didn’t have time to research and compare multiple recipes. I needed a failsafe recipe with lots of directions and tips so I wouldn’t mess up my first ever tiramisu. This recipe delivered all of that. I wasn’t left with random amounts of zabaglione or even coffee to dispose off. Spot on flavor. I used a sweet marsala for the alcohol.

    The only thing I would caution someone wanting to make a 9 x 13″ pan of this (for double the recipe), if you use a pan that is only 2″ high like my Nordic ware aluminum pan, you should hold back a little of the zabaglione mixture. Else you’ll get a really really full pan. With a deeper pan double the recipe will work perfectly, with a few extra cookies left over. I did toy with the idea of going 1.5 times instead of double for this pan size, but since no baking and leavening was involved, I thought double was the way to go. I was mostly right: 1.5 times would not have enough cookies or coffee mixture to cover 9×13″ pan in two layers.

    xxxxxyyyyy

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